Blog Assignment #20

Hey North House,

I hope you all had a decent weekend. Our last semester as high schoolers officially starts tomorrow (Jan. 29, 2017) and with that a new chapter of our lives. Whether we like it or not it is happening.  For this week’s blog post I wanted to share with you an article about five pieces of wisdom a reader can take away from Jane Austen’s novels. You can find the article here

Prompt:

Does any of these lessons connect with your life? If so how? 

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28 Comments

  1. The article “5 Lessons from the Great Jane Austen” by Meredith Lepore has many (well, 5) lessons that I don’t relate to in the slightest, unfortunately. I can easily agree with the first point that one should turn a hobby into a career and see the need for fulfillment outside of money, though being a high school student, it seems like a more appropriate contention to make in my early thirties. The second point is stating that we should all give people a second chance. I agree with this, to an extend. Should we give a second chance to the best friend who said something mean about us? Yes. Should we give a second chance to someone who punched a baby? Maybe. Second chance for Adolf Hitler? No. Although giving second chances rests entirely within one’s proclivity to do so and their own moral code, so some people might get second chances easier than others. The third point states that emotions should not overrun our lives. Again I agree to an extent – most important decisions should be made logically. Others definitely require steady piloting from our hearts. And it’s always healthy to cry every now and then, anyways. The fourth point states that wit and intelligence will make you the life of the party. I’m fairly witty and the last party I was invited to, I was 9 and I was given an invitation because everyone had to get one or no one got one. Enough said. And the final contention says I should be glad I’m a woman today, and rather than when Austen was. I’m not a woman, I’m a white male, and despite how messed up my people have been through history, everything has pretty much been sunny side up on my end.

  2. Jane Austen defined a writing style for her era. Many of her novels involved superstition on the lives of British men and social causes in society. This adaptation influenced many people. In the article, by Meredith Lepore, called “5 lessons from the Great Jane Austen”, she writes of the many lessons Jane Austen attempts to express in her novels.

    I agree that many of the five lessons expressed in Jane Austen’s Novels correlate with my own life. I feel with reading “Pride and Prejudice” I was able to connect with the story as the morals progressed. Likewise, most of her lessons formulate a memory I can relate with her novels. One being to give people a second chance. I’ve always been a firm believer in having compassion for someone else’s faults. As Noah stated, “Although giving second chances rests entirely within one’s proclivity to do so and their own moral code, so some people might get second chances easier than others”. I agree completely because this means, in certain cases, overlooking and understanding issues in friendships and family is important to understand because in the end, you love them regardless. Looks can, inevitably, be deceiving and having compassion really enhances your moral and judgement towards others.

    Another is not letting your emotions overrun your life. Although, I can’t speak for all women, I tend to let my emotions and nerves dictate how I act in a situation. This can result in letting my nerves and superstitions on life overrun my decisions. This has resulted in my emotions directing my life. But through experience, I’ve learned that emotions can only run your life, if you let them. Thus, pushing through hard decisions, not letting my nerves or sensitivity decide them, has become my priority.

  3. In response to Althea’s prompt I do believe that two out of the five lessons stated within the article, “5 Lessons From the Great Jane Austen”, connect with my life.

    The first lesson I connected to was “Do give people a second chance”, this was so personal to me because I believe forgiveness is very important in life. Personally, I know that if I were to ask someone to forgive me I would genuinely be sorry and hope I could redeem myself via second chance. Thus, I must do the same and try to see the good in others, and determine if a second chance is earned. The second lesson I related to was “Do not let emotions overrun your life”, and for me that is very difficult. I believe I am a very emotional person which at some times could be a weakness. However, I agree with the statement that Noah made,”Again I agree to an extent – most important decisions should be made logically…And it’s always healthy to cry every now and then, anyways.” Overall, I found the article to be very interesting and the impact Jane Austen has made in the literature world is very significant.

  4. In Meredith Lepore’s article, “5 Lessons From the Great Jane Austen” she discusses the admiration and love people have for Austen’s talents in literature in celebration of the 200th anniversary of Pride and Prejudice. From there, Lepore goes over a few lessons in detail about what we should learn from the talented Pride and Prejudice author.

    Out of the five lessons, I would say that I relate and connect most to the second lesson about giving people second chances since I am that one person who gives people chance after chance after chance. The article states that “Perhaps it is because so many of us can relate to getting one impression of a person and then finding them to be completely different. P&P is all about learning to forgive people for their first impressions, negative as they may be, and give them a second chance.” and to add on, it is difficult to give someone a second chance, especially when not everyone deserves it, however you should always still consider it. Along with Janina G., I also believe that forgiveness is an important part in life, but there does come a point where you need to draw a line.

    Another lesson that I found relatable was the fifth lesson about being glad to be a woman of today and not during the time period of Austen. I always think about how truly lucky I am to live in time and place where I am allowed to get a job, have the opportunity to vote, be independent, and live a good life without getting married or even wear jeans and not fancy dresses all the time. I am forever grateful for the women (and also some men) of the past who fought for our rights and being the reason I am able to live this type of life, even long after Jane Austen’s time. Although not everything is fine and dandy for women just yet, I would say we were left at a good place to continue on.

  5. Clearly a fan of Jane Austen blogger Meredith Lepore shared with her fellow Austener’s a quick piece tiled “5 Lessons From the Great Jane Austen,” that in her opinion can be pulled from the author. One by one Lepore lists the five lessons that characterize Austen’s works of literature from her notable novel “Pride and Prejudice,” to her other famed works. The lessons explained are not anything new. They give perspective and clearly reflect the role of women that Austen so dearly wanted to highlight.

    The role of women during the Regency period was different and restricted compared to the modern western role of women. Lesson five states “Be glad you are a woman today.” In “Pride and Prejudice,” readers really get a glimpse of what Lepore is trying to reference. The Bennet sisters find themselves in a predicament, they must be wed to wealthy men. Their father, oblivious in many cases cannot (do to society) allow his daughters to inherit his fortune. Instead the story takes the reader through scandal, heartbreak, and sorrow that could have been avoided if the daughters were able to be their own. Today women have the same rights men do. I agree with Lepore that women should be glad they are born in a time where equal rights and opportunity for women is standard in most of world.

    If I can relate any of these lessons to my life it would be number two, “do give people second chances.” It can be difficult to forgive those who have done us wrong, but to carry anger towards a person makes one bitter. In other cases, I have to agree with Lepore, that the impression we get about others from people versus our actual experiences can be different. Janina and Jaydalyn so clearly articulated a statement I find very true. We should forgive those who may not deserve it, but there should be a line drawn.  

  6. There is something to be said about each of these lessons. Obviously lessons like, “turn your hobby into your career” and “do remember that wit and smarts will make you the life of the party” won’t apply to everyone, but lessons like “don’t let your emotions run your life” should be gently reminded to many of the people I have to share oxygen with. As for what I got out of these lessons, here are my two cents.

    Turning my hobby into my career is definitely something I personally plan to do. However, I wouldn’t dare suggest such a broad decision like this to anyone else. You are the one that needs to assess what your hobby is, how you make it a career, and how low your standard of living is. Then, it is up to you to decide for yourself. Obviously you will have a lot more luck if you have a viable hobby, and don’t ask a lot out of life, as well of course, It couldn’t hurt to have actual talent.

    In regards to forgiveness, I may not give the impression, but I am a very forgiving person. However, it is much more difficult to get me to forget. Forgiving is simply the act of letting go, and moving on. To forget however, would be not to learn, and to absently let history repeat itself again. As Jaydalynn put it, “there does come a point where you need to draw a line.” Wounds will heal, but only if you let them. I, for one, do not believe in second chances for just this reason.

    Keeping one’s emotions in check is a skill. Emotional intelligence can be developed, and it should be. There is little that I find less attractive than when someone cannot keep their head in a critical situation. Self-discipline is very important, and without it, one begins to overindulge oneself. Lest you wish to wallow in your own degeneracy, exercise a little self-control.

    Although wit and smarts are very attractive qualities indeed, without a little charisma, they are not worth much. Perhaps I am just a textbook example of Freudian psychology, or maybe I am just very vain, but I find it much harder to listen to the words of someone I find unattractive. A mind of admirable intellect is easily spoiled by a rotten soul (or an ugly mug).

    As for the last one, although I am no woman, I can absolutely appreciate the sentiment. There are too many ingrates in today’s world, as I’m sure there always have been. However the average quality of life today is even higher than it has ever been before. There are bums today that have a higher standard of living than kings of the past. Even still, that fact will never truly be appreciated, because we have little comprehension of how pampered we truly are in the first world. Our heads are trapped in a cycle of appeasement. When not subjected to real problems, the mind will simply create it’s own. If you wish to pursue happiness, you would be wise to break the cycle, and make an effort to appreciate your reality for what it is.

  7. In the article called, “5 Lessons from the Great Jane Austen” it provides lessons or tips chosen from Jane Austen and helps us give an insight on whether or not it connects to our life. Personally, I feel that ‘lesson’ number 1 and ‘lesson’ number 2 apply or connect to my life.

    Lesson Number One: Turn your hobby into a career. Most of classmates know that I very engaged in photography and film. Although film and photography is not the main course I want to take as a career, but it is something I will keep beside me and will eventually pursue as my second career. I believe that whatever you are passionate about or deeply in love with doing is something we should look into or pursue regardless if your parents or friends don’t agree with the path you want to take (in a good way). If it is your dream or passion, chase after it and accomplish it. It would be a waste to sit it aside, forget, and sit at a desk filing papers for your boss at this job you do not like. And I agree with Colin E. when he said, “You are the one that needs to assess what your hobby is, how you make it a career, and how low your standard of living is” because the decisions you make are made upon you and no one else. The people around are there for support and advice. They do not get a say in what you finalize.

    Lesson Number Two: Do give the second chance. I believe that in relationships, careers, and in life we are deserve to give that second chance to someone or something. Of course it should not be a simple give and go, but if it is worth giving a second chance to, then give that chance. There are some cases where that someone or something does not deserve another chance since the first time ended in a negative direction, but like I said before, if it is worth it, then give it. In some occasions, you see this happen a lot in relationships. Should I give him/her another chance? Are they worth my time and effort? I bring this up because you see this “second chance” in a relationship happen in Pride and Prejudice where the first time things did not go the right way between Elizabeth and Darcy, but after giving him a second chance later on, they get married. The only way to know if it is worth giving another chance is all based on you.

    In conclusion, I have turned the lessons I chose into giving lessons about them. But overall, these two lessons from this article have applied to me before and still does now. I do believe that we should turn our hobby into a career and that we should give someone or something that second chance. We are not doing this please someone, but because we are doing this to make us happy.

  8. I think the lesson that I can connect most with in my life is lesson five, “Be glad you are a woman today, and not when Austen was”.
    During Jane Austen’s time, women had an insignificant amount of control over their lives. All of her finances were tied to the men in her life. She inherited what she could from her father. If she were lucky enough to have a brother, then she would have a house to live in after her father passed or until she got married. This is because estates were usually entailed to the males in the family and not the women. The money she inherited would be given to the man she married. Women never got a hold of their finances.
    Women also needed to act a certain way in the society of Austen’s time. When Mr. Bingley, Mr. Darcy, and Caroline Bingley were talking about accomplished women, they listed several traits: paint tables, cover screens, net purses; have thorough knowledge of music, singing, drawing, dancing, and the modern languages; possess a certain something in her air and manner of walking, the tone of her voice, her address and expressions; and spend her time by reading extensively. These were traits all women MUST have in order to be called accomplished. Elizabeth Bennet chimes into the conversation and remarks how she knows no woman of the sort, not to make females seem inferior or unaccomplished, but to bring light to the unrealistic expectations of women.
    The reason I relate to lesson five is because as a woman in society today is because I have so many more rights and opportunities than I would have back then. I can have my own bank account, not lived my life worried about not having a brother, and don’t need to be married to have money or a home. I can call myself accomplished without knowing how to net purses or be aware of my manner of walking. I really am glad I am a woman today than when Austen was. That isn’t to say that women don’t have struggles and problems now. There are still countries in this world that are oppressing women and men still enforcing false stereotypes about women. I like the way Jaydalynn puts it, “Although not everything is fine and dandy for women just yet, I would say we were left at a good place to continue on.” Women are still fighting the great fight for equality. We don’t have as many barriers as women of Austen’s time, but the there are still barriers.

  9. This is a compelling blog assignment in which I believe it is somewhat directed at myself as fate may have been in play but, no matter. As these five lessons are listed by Jane Austen, I heavily have to disagree with each and every one of the lessons aside from the last which is more aimed towards female readers. To clarify, by disagreeing, I mean the opposite of the lesson, the pessimistic side.
        For the first lesson of turning a hobby into a career, there is a general disagreement for this one. You see, my paternal side of the family enjoys the great outdoors, ranging from fishing and even hunting. Nonetheless, these are simple hobbies away from the back-breaking careers they have to endure. That is why they are hobbies, an escape from reality and a time to appreciate life. If someone was to make their hobby into a career, it would be meaningless and absurd to do so because that one person would be sick and tired of doing that same activity they longed for every single day. A hobby is meant for temporary relief from stress and having it worthwhile. The little things to enjoy in life so no person can begin a shooting rampage in the local Walmart from dread and rage as seen in Glendale, Arizona.
        As for the next piece of second chances, I would have the same answer as I stated previously. I do not like to forgive or apologize to anyone or for anything. I hold a grudge for many things in life, particularly my father in which I would not state why, although with much remorse on my part also. Second chances should not be a thing in my opinion, because the first chance should have been done right the first time. As second chances are regarded as a sign of weakness.
        This list seems to be personal from the start but the third lesson is not allowing emotions to take control of your life. In my experience, it’s already too late for that. In my case, emotions are built up and bottles through years of frustration and angst until the  snap of a finger. In between those periods, I stay quiet, usually introverted and withdrawn to myself.
        And for the last part, I sole heartedly agree with Collin’s statement of “I can absolutely appreciate the sentiment” in which I can too. Women have come a long way to where they are now thankfully. Aside from the fashion culture and marriage as evident from the article, I owe my mother anything and everything for raising me and putting up with my inner turmoil’s. Regarding the contrast between time, I’m glad I was born in Germany in the near 21st century instead of the years following the rise of the Third Reich.

  10. Emotions are so unpredictable. They can be relaxed one minute and excruciating the next. It’s like the roller coasters we learned about in Holt’s. If only they were that straightforward.
    What I have come to realize in my life is that I hate arguments. They arise from such a stupid reason to only end up in turmoil between the two people who started it. At times, I feel that if I had just kept my mouth shut (or speak up in other cases), relationships would not be so complicated.
    Jane Austen’s third lesson is one I hope to live by. While I may be argumentative at times, I just hate to see people depressed. It is one attribute of myself that I have mixed feelings about. I’ll just have to see what I do with it, because as Jennifer says it: “emotions can only run your life, if you let them.”

  11. Reading the article 5 Lessons from the Great Jane, there were some that I could connect to my life. One was giving people a second chance. First impressions can be hard for some people and may cause them to act a way that may rub off on someone as odd or horrid, but it doesn’t hurt to give someone a second chance. It would be like judging a book by its cover before reading the preface. Yet again, there are those people who make great first impressions but then turn out to be this person who you come to dislike very much.
    Another lesson that I could relate to my life is not letting my emotions overrun my life. If people where to follow their heart without thinking first, it would cause many people pain. For example, I am going to use myself. I was in a bad relationship that was long distance and things seemed to fall apart but my wanting to let my heart take control I was hurt a countless amount of times. It took time and effort to realize that I was just hurting myself and the only way to get out of it was to cut that person out of my life. Yes, there was pain but the pain of letting that person go only last for a little while but in the end, it was good for me. Learning from those mistakes that I made has helped me not follow in those footsteps again. As Jennifer said, emotions can only run your life if you let them and by learning that it is much easier to have a guard up for not getting hurt.
    Lastly, I am glad that I am a woman today and not back when Austen was. Reading Pride and Prejudice gave me an in-depth perspective of how life for a young lady was and I know if I were to have lived back then, I wouldn’t follow society’s rules. Not being able to be your own person, marrying for money and not for love, being forced to do things you don’t want to do, it all sounds horrible. Now a days, women today have a great advantage than women from back then because they can speak for themselves and able to live the way they want to.

  12. From the article, ” 5 Lessons From the Great Jane Austin” I can relate to a couple of the points stated. The first lesson is, turn your hobby into your career. My number one hobby is soccer. I have been playing soccer for approximately thirteen years and when people ask about my childhood, I reply with the one word of soccer. Even though I have many great memories on the soccer field, I will not purse soccer as a career but I was always have it as a hobby. If someone wants to purse their hobby to a career, then let them.

    The second lesson also has some connection to my life was giving people a second chance. As Jessica said ” First impressions can be hard for some people and may cause them to act a way that may rub off as someone as odd or horrid.” I agree with this statement because people are not perfect. They will make accidental mistakes or do things on purpose but for the most part, I believe in second changes. I also believe in second changes because some people are misunderstood or for example, Mr. Darcy in Pride and Prejudice. When we first met him, he was very distant and refused to associate with anyone. The reason was because of certain events that happened in the past. At the beginning of the movie, Elizabeth absolutely hated Darcy but towards to end, Elizabeth fell in love with him.

  13. In Meredith Lepore’s article, “5 Lessons From The Great Jane Austen,” Lepore describes several different “ideas” from various Austen novels that we humans can use to help improve our lives or at the very least internalize to see if they are the right fit for a specific individual. Personally, I evaluated each lesson and there were two in particular that stood out to me.

    The first being, “Turn your hobby into a career.” Although that phrase seems incredibly uplifting and is something I would pay $17.99 to read about in a book by a celebrity from Barnes and Noble, deep down I can’t resonate with it at all. I wholeheartedly agree with Kenneth when he says a hobby is, “an escape from reality and a time to appreciate life.” That’s one of the sole purposes of a hobby, an escape from the hustle and bustle of everyday living. A hobby is something that you only practice when you feel like it – hobbies are completely different than passions. I cannot say passion is what Lepore meant when she was writing this article, but it would make a better fit because passion is something you practice even when you don’t feel like it. Passion is what gets your blood pumping, it’s what sets your soul on fire, it’s what will eventually become purpose. Hobbies and passions are two completely different things, and hobbies are not something to turn into a career – but passion is something you can use to transform to be revolutionary.

    The second “idea” that Lepore stated that also resonated with me was, “Do give people a second chance.” I am a firm believer in second chances because sometimes as a human you weren’t ready for the first chance. I’ve come to terms with the idea that as humans, we’re fallible creatures, it’s our nature. I don’t know where I would be in my life if it weren’t for second chances – they’re something you must be grateful for, though. Lepore states that Pride and Prejudice are about “learning to forgive people for their first impressions,” because we’re humans, we could just be having a bad day. There are people on this campus who didn’t make a very good first impression on me, and I’m sure the same goes vice versa – but some who rubbed me the wrong way in the past turned out to be quite resourceful group members and colleagues. Personally, professionally, emotionally – second chances can make a difference.

    Lepore offers an interesting perspective on how themes, motifs, and ideas found in Austen’s novels. Some lessons have a greater or more personal application than others – but ultimately, they’re all universal that can be difficult to be indifferent about.

  14. While this article offers some value, I think most of what is expressed here is not relevant to most people. Perhaps I’m just too much of a emotionless pile of discarded pineapple peels, but it seems like much of the values expressed are simply common sense. For example, lesson one: “Turn your hobby into a career”. Well yeah. Anyone living in a first-class nation where a variety of jobs are open and is not in dire need for income will almost certainly choose a career they are interested in and are adequately proficient. And what is a hobby? Well, something that you are both interested in and are good in doing. I don’t believe I know anyone who has said they want to be an engineer because they hate math and try to avoid it. Of course there are limits to this argument like if you want to be an esports gamer *shudder*, because you like games. But for the most part, most respecting adults already do this.

    All of the other four lessons essentially lie on the same sort of common sense logic, but I would also like to address lesson three: “Don’t let your emotions overrun your life”, because it resonates with my stoic philosophy so much. Much of the time we fail to realize that the emotions that control our life (and they do), are nowhere as important as we think they are. Because we fail to neglect that emotions are simply products of our own psyche that have no grounds in reality or pragmatism. But nonetheless, especially in America, depression will occur due to perceived thoughts and murders will erupt from anger. It’s absolutely ridiculous.I think Collin said it best when he said that “Even still, that fact will never truly be appreciated, because we have little comprehension of how pampered we truly are in the first world.”

  15. If I turned my hobby into a career I would get nowhere in life. A better suggestion would be to do what makes you happy. Personally helping people makes me happy and that is why I am going to pursue a career as a nurse, getting to meet new people every day and getting to know them and care for them. None of my hobbies do that for me. In this case, it worked out because a writer can publish books and become popular so is the case with instruments, art, films, photos and other things of that sort.

    Giving someone a second chance is not always the best idea, it is it just gives someone another chance to hurt you again. In some cases, it may be true where people change and you get to live a happily ever after in any sort of relationship but people tend to return to who they truly are. Some people are out here to make you feel horrible for a multitude of reasons. People can be wolves hidden in sheep’s clothing attacking those with good hearts for their own benefits. I am not saying to never give someone a second chance but be cautious because you never know a person’s true intentions with you. Noah brought up a fair point when he said, “some people might get second chances easier than others.” On the severity of what a person does you should also judge whether they get a second chance or even how hard they have to work for that second chance.

  16. After reading Meredith Lepore’s article titled “5 Lessons From the Great Jane Austen,” I found myself relating to the second and third lesson the most. The second idea mentioned by Lepore was to give people a second chance, relating this concept to Darcy and Elizabeth from Pride and Prejudice. Many times in my life I have given people second chances, and certain people more than that. I have always been the type of person to allow people chance after chance because I try and see the best in people no matter how badly they may have treated me or how bad of an impression I got from them. However, as I have grown up I have realized that although it may be good to give people second chances, some people are just not deserving of them. Like Josh had stated in his post, “There are some cases where that someone or something does not deserve another chance since the first time ended in a negative direction, but like I said before, if it is worth it, then give it.” I agree with Josh because I too believe that sometimes it may be hard to give second chances but in the end if it is worth it then a second chance should be offered.

    As for the third lesson Lepore writes about regarding letting emotions overrun your life, again I can relate to what she speaks about. There have been many times in my life where I let my emotions over rule my judgment and I end up making decisions I regret or acting in ways I probably shouldn’t. However, overtime I have come to learn that emotions do not have to run your life if you don’t let them. I think Romel summed it up perfectly when he said “Much of the time we fail to realize that the emotions that control our life (and they do), are nowhere as important as we think they are.”

  17. An unknown author once said, “Chances are there not just to correct mistakes. But to determine with.” In many instances, people are blinded by what they hear or believe, rather than seeking the truth. According to the article, “5 Lessons From the Great Jane Austen,” author Meredith Lepore presents five memorable lessons from Jane Austen’s novels. In one lesson, she addresses the notion of giving people second chances, and undeniably, it relates to my life.

    Amusingly, I find my character similar to that of Elizabeth Bennet, from the popular novel “Pride and Prejudice.” In the beginning, she tends to be presumptuous and unwavering in her opinions. Based on what she views, she speculates. As a result, it not only offends and hurts Mr. Darcy, but it also harms her. As unfortunate as it may seem, that is how many humans are. Christopher Q. phrased it perfectly when he wrote, “we’re fallible creatures, it’s our nature.”

    Therefore, that is why there are second chances. It is an opportunity to forgive and be humble; it is a chance to redeem and restore what was lost. Without it, the world is hostile.

  18. After reading the article, I realized that I connect with two of the lessons. I connect a lot with lesson #3 which states, “Do not let your emotions overrun your life.” There has been many times where I act upon my emotions. Especially when I’m angry or upset or just plain moody. Those acts that I have made always end up making me feel regret. Instead of putting my emotions aside and thinking about what I say or do, I ended up hurting someone in the process. With time, I learned that it’s easy to put my feelings aside to make the better choice. I think I’m able to do that because of a lot of regretful mistakes.

    I also found that I connected with lesson #5 which states, “Be glad you are a woman today, and not when Austen was.” Even with lots of people who are anti-feminism, and ugly Trump who doesn’t want to let us women have our say ok our own bodies but women have grown stronger since Austen times and I’ve seen so many beautiful and independent women that I look up to. I couldn’t be happier with how amazing is women can be and how we can overcome so many obstacles. I think Jaydalynn summed it up pretty well, “Although not everything is fine and dandy for women just yet, I would say we were left at a good place to continue on.”

  19. In the article entitled, “5 Lessons from the Great Jane Austen” written by Meredith Lepore, discusses the valuable lessons to take from the iconic author Jane Austen. Out of the five lessons listed, I found that the second and fifth ones connect to my life the most. The second lesson states, “Do give people a second chance”. I feel that I often give people second chances even if they do not deserve it. It is difficult for me to give second chances to people whose first impression of them was negative. In my opinion, first impressions mean everything because, it is not easy to forget a first impression of a person. However, I found that giving second chances is worth it in the end. I believe that people change for the better, and it would be unfair to not give someone a second chance based on negative past encounters. Samara states, “I have always been the type of person to allow people chance after chance because I try and see the best in people no matter how badly they may have treated me or how bad of an impression I got from them”. I have the same belief as Samara when it comes to giving second chances.

    The fifth lesson states, “Be glad you are a women today, and not when Austen was”. I relate to this lesson because I am genuinely grateful to be born in an era where I can do anything I set my mind to. Back in Austen’s time, women were not given the opportunities that I sometimes take for granted today. This only motivates me more to work hard to achieve my dreams.

  20. Out of the five lessons mentioned in the article, “5 Lessons From the Great Jane Austen” I am going to respond to the first two. I think the first lesson, “Turn your hobby into your career” works for many people, but in my case my hobby is playing sports. Growing up I have loved to play sports, but considering the fact that it is extremely hard to become a professional athlete, it is not a career I plan on pursuing. Sports have always been just that, a hobby. I have never thought to myself I would become a professional athlete.

    I also connected with lesson #2, “Do give people a second chance” because as Kenny said, “People are not perfect. They will make accidental mistakes or do things on purpose but for the most part, I believe in second chances.” I agree with him because people may truly be sorry for what they did, and with another chance they can prove it. One way it was shown in Pride and Prejudice was with first impressions, it turned out characters were not the types of people they were first shown to be.

  21. In Meredith Lepore’s post, “5 Lessons From the Great Jane Austen,” she lists things we can learn from Austen. Of the five lessons, I felt I could relate to the third which states, “Do not let emotions overrun your life.” Feeling emotions is human nature but to let emotions control my life would be insane. I’ve learned that it’s best to think things through. I come from a family that doesn’t hold back and is very emotion-driven thus they often find themselves regretting the things they say or do. Emotions can lead many to act on impulse, which isn’t necessarily bad if the situation calls for it, but majority of the time it can lead people to do things they’ll no doubt regret. Impulse is the thing that leads people to say hurtful things out of anger or buy expensive things out of excitement. As Alejandra wisely said, “With time, I’ve learned that it’s easy to put my feelings aside to make the better choice.” I know I won’t always be able to control my emotions but I’ll always try my best to not let them control me, especially when making decisions.

  22. The article, “5 Lessons from the Great Jane Austen,” was very inciteful having not read all her books. Although, knowing little about Jane Austen herself, I was able to see her life through her characters because of the article and short videos. In the video of “Becoming Jane,” it showed a seen where Jane says that she will not marry someone unless she loved them and she kept that promise because inevitably she never did marry, and I can see that part of her in Elizabeth as she denied Mr. Collins and Mr. Darcy even though Mr. Darcy was extremely rich. The article also gave us the best quote ever that I think is so funny because you can hear her unbeatable sass as shown in her novels too, “The person, be it gentleman or lady, who has not pleasure in a good novel, must be intolerably stupid.” All of this considered is to show that Jane Austen’s character and personality was strong and she would not bend over backwards for anybody and that is what I love about her and her books.

    I feel similar to Jane Austen’s character through the first lesson that says, “Turn your hobby into your career.” I feel strongly about doing what you love as a career because if you’re not enjoying what you’re doing with your life what’s the point? I agree with Josh when he said, “I believe that whatever you are passionate about or deeply in love with doing is something we should look into or pursue.” Someday I want to do what I love with my career and instead of dreading Mondays and rejoicing on Fridays, I want to dread Fridays and rejoice on Mondays, because life’s too short to be anything but happy.

  23. The first lesson “Turn your hobby into your career” is one that resonates the most with me because of what I want to do with my life. I have always known that I never wanted to end up being the person who is unhappy with their career choice, dreading every agonizing moment of a job that just pays the bills. Unfortunately, in this capitalistic society that we live in, I oftentimes see many instances of people working towards a career pathway for the wrong reasons; sure, one can work their way towards becoming a hedge fund manager (which have an incredibly rewarding salaries), but does that person really have a love or passion for their work? Is their career pathway rewarding to them in genuine ways?

    One of the things that I admire about Jane Austen is that she dared to pursue a career in doing something that she loved. She offered a new and unconventional voice in her writing at the time, and was not afraid to show it. The article even detailed that Austen had a love for writing and telling stories to her family since her youth. Clearly, writing had always been a hobby and a passion for Austen that she turned into a career.

    Personally, one of my hobbies is promoting my Mexican culture by performing Ballet Folklorico with my dance group. One of my passions is raising awareness and tolerance for immigrants in the United States. I plan to continue doing these things in my future, regardless of the numbers for annual salaries. I aspire to be a woman like Jane Austen; a woman who loves what she does, and leaves a lasting impact doing it. As Josh mentioned in his blog post, “If it is your dream or passion, chase after it and accomplish it. It would be a waste to sit it aside, forget, and sit at a desk filing papers for your boss at this job you do not like.”

    Christian Dior once said that he never felt like he worked a day in his life, because he loved his career in fashion. Although I have no way of telling exactly what the future holds for me, I know that I will dare to pursue a career that I have a real passion for.

  24. In my opinion, I believe that the first two lessons connect with my life.

    The first lesson was “Turn your Hobby into Your Career.” Since right now I am a little bit frantic about what to do in college. I know what I want to become. I want to do what I am interested in as I am entering a stage where I get to know myself better as a person. For the second lesson, it is “Do Give People a Second Chances.” I believe that the first impressions someone gives off is not always how they really are. So getting to know someone even more or actually letting them redeem themselves after a mistake they promise not to make again is good. It might turn for the better after talking to them once more. Like Kenny said, “I also believe in second changes because some people are misunderstood…”

    So to conclude, I feel like those two really connect with my life. We all need to pursue what we like to do. (So we won’t be miserable as working adults.) Also give people a second chance because it can be amazing how someone can change after meeting them a bit more.

  25. I believe the lesson that connects more with my life is the “Be glad you are a woman today” lesson. In today’s society we are accustomed to seeing independent women. Women are able to inherit or make money as they please; no longer are women dependent on men to grant them wealth. In the book Pride and Prejudice just like Nick said, “The Bennet sisters find themselves in a predicament, they must be wed to wealthy men. Their father, oblivious in many cases cannot (do to society) allow his daughters to inherit his fortune.” We are lucky to live in a time where women do not have to depend upon others and can make something of herself.

  26. Out of the five lessons mentioned in the article, I could only relate to two. Turning my hobby into a career won’t be as fulfilling to do something that I’m passionate about. I agree what Isaac said earlier,” A better suggestion would be to do what makes you happy.” Finding a career that’s fulfilling and can make a change is the most important thing to me.

    The second lesson I connected to is giving people second chances. I am very forgiving person, at times I’m too forgiving but it’s good to let go. People make mistakes, but second chances don’t go out to everyone. Like Jaydalynn said,” I also believe that forgiveness is an important part in life, but there does come a point where you need to draw a line.” Giving someone another chance can mean them repeating that mistake, sometimes forgiveness isn’t always the answer.

  27. The article “5 Lessons from the Great Jane Austen”, by Meredith Lepore lists five lessons that she feels are of most value to the people of today. The author believes that the morals and lesson from Austen’s books transcend through time, and still applies to the modern person. I agree with the author’s claims. Austen’s books give the modern person the ability to transport to the past, and get an in-depth understanding of what life was like in the Austen’s time.

    Of the five lessons the author states, I concur with lessons one, three, and five. Lesson one, is to turn your hobby into your career. Austen loved to write, so she turned that into her career, which is an ethic I believe most people should do with their lives. If you enjoy something greatly, why not make a living out of it? The next lesson that I agree with is the third one, to not let your emotions overrun your life. I am very much a logical thinker. In life, when I am in a conundrum, I like to take a step back and evaluate all the plausible actions I could take that would be beneficial to me. Emotions are messy, and can easily lead to more problems. I would much rather listen to reason than my hormones. The final lesson that I agree with is the fifth, which is to be glad to be living in the present. While it may be nice to read about the past, to be a woman and not white is a terrible thing. To even go thirty years in the past would be terrible. In fact with what is going on with the world today, the present is not even a good time be anything other than white and male. Since humans are constantly attempting to progress, to go in the past would be a hellish nightmare, especially if you were not rich. The present may not be too great, but the past is much worse. Like Jaydalynn said, “Although not everything is fine and dandy for women just yet, I would say we were left at a good place to continue on.”

  28. I relate to the first two lessons from the article “5 lessons from the great Jane Austen”, by Meredith Lepors. She exemplifies relations. Between the classic book and modern day life. Her first lesson ,”do give people a second chance” forgiving people can be often difficult in some circumstances. But the rewards for forgiveness can be incredibly beneficial if you are not betrayed a second time. Therefore depending on the situation you may have more or less of a chance in having positive effects through forgiveness.
    Her second controversial lesson, “don’t let emotions overrun your life” I say it’s controversial because often I find that emotions are what give you purpose and definition in life. Without emotion you are robotic, you are a heartless sociopath who has lack of empathy. Though I deeply admire a robotic person, I know these people have had the worst of it resulting in the abandonment of emotion as a whole. Though lack of emotions sometimes emits strength I know vulnerability to be essential in growing as a person. I agree with Noah when he says, “… it’s always healthy to cry every now and then, anyways.” It’s undeniable that a good cry will be extremely alleviating, it’s almost therapeutic to release your psychological tension as well as the physical one. If you’ve seen inside out by Disney then you know (spoiler alert) that sadness is the most important piece of the puzzle that is your wholeness.

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