Blog #14

Hello North house! I hope you all had a decent week. For this weeks blog I decided to venture into the world of the seven deadly sins. I know we all probably have heard enough about this, but because we just read the prologue for The Canterbury Tales I figured watching this video will help you compare the seven deadly sins to characters in The Canterbury Tales.

This video titled Are Spongebob & his friends based on the 7 deadly sins? explores the theory that Spongebob and the other main characters from the show are based on the seven deadly sins. The narrator of the video then goes on to explain how each character is connected to the seven deadly sins. After reading the prologue of The Canterbury Tales we were given the extra credit option to think about what sins were some of the characters committing. After viewing this video hopefully it can help you connect which characters are committing which sins from The Canterbury Tales. I chose this video ultimately to bring a different twist on the way we have been learning about the seven deadly sins. Personally I believe this theory is true. I do not think the creators of Spongebob intentionally made the show about the seven deadly sins, however I think they used the sins as a foundation for creating their characters. On the other hand I believe that maybe this could have been a way for the writers of Spongebob to introduce the seven deadly sins in a subtle way to a younger audience. Those are my thoughts, but feel free to explain yours through the prompt.

After viewing this video please answer the following prompt.

Prompt: Do you agree with this theory that Spongebob and the other main characters are based of of the seven deadly sins? If so why? If you do not agree, then why not. Do you think the creators of Spongebob did this intentionally? How does this information apply to what we have read about the Canterbury Tales?

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26 Comments

  1. In response to the prompt I do agree that Spongebob, along with the other main characters, are representations of the seven deadly sins. Throughout my childhood I never really understood the seven deadly sins, however now being older and examining the cartoon I can see how the sins could have been a templet in designing the characters. My belief on how the characters were molded by the sins a belief that Audissey H agrees with because she writes “I do not think the creators of Spongebob intentionally made the show about the seven deadly sins, however I think they used the sins as a foundation for creating their characters.”. During the video given the presenter begins to list the characters and what sins they belong to, and I was just as surprised as her to hear that Gary, Spongebob’s snail, represents the sin of gluttony. However, it really does make sense because Spongebob is constantly remembering that he must get home and feed his snail.

    The way I believe this information applies to what we have read in the Canterbury Tales is through the concept of analysing. I never really thought of my childhood cartoon being a representation of the Seven Deadly Sins and in the case of the Canterbury Tales had it not have been for Ms. Edwards telling the class ahead of time I never would have been able to analyze and identify that connection. Therefore this just shows me that sometimes digging deeper into a text can provide a whole new view.

  2. To answer Audissey H. question, the creators did intentionally base the main characters of Spongebob in accordance with the seven deadly sins. According to the video, “Are Spongebob & His Friends Based On The 7 Deadly Sins?” the shows creator Steven Hillenburg wanted to incorporate the Christian vices on the program. The habits did not overtake the happy-go-lucky feeling of the cartoon but it was used as a way to show the vices of each character. What fun is watching the narrative of characters without faults? The faults make each character interesting and relatable. We all have our moments of being greedy and money hungry like Mr. Krabs and only wanting food like Gary. It is what makes us human and relatable, trying to stray away from these bad habits makes our stories more worthwhile and meaningful.

    Like Spongebob Squarepants, the Canterbury Tales blended the characteristics of the seven deadly sins in almost all the characters of his tale. Geoffrey Chaucer was familiar and accustomed enough to experience the evil doings and bad habits of different ranks of people throughout his life and he used his narrative to vent his observations. Spongebob is the Canterbury Tales but less detailed. We see the direct and literal meaning of each of the character’s sins in each of the main characters of Spongebob Squarepants.

  3. Before writing this current post I wrote an entire conspiracy surrounding Spongebob Squarepants, the US government and Paul Blart the Mall Cop. It was pretty facetious and I wish you could’ve read it because it would’ve made a far more entertaining read that what you are about to read right now. Because in truth I do not believe that Spongebob Squarepants’ characters are based off the seven deadly sins, even if as Althea noted “the shows creator Steven Hillenburg wanted to incorporate the Christian vices on the program.”Reason being, that Nickelodeon would never agree to such a show premise. Imagine Steven walking into a production office and pitching the idea of incorporating christian sins into a children’s show for a network that was largely based off goofy animated cartoons. Well, it just doesn’t sound pragmatically possible.

    Chances in reality are likely that the producers of the show initially took a chance on the show, uncertain whether kids would buy into the show or not. Gradually as time went on and the show became more popular, the producers began to stick their hands deeper into the development of the characters and stories. Archetype after archetype, the characters must’ve gone through so many changes the producers simply called this one lazy, this one angry, etc. Eventually, we were given the characters we have come to know and it is all a coincidence that it managed to match up.

    We’ve seen this in other productions. For example Star Wars was also picked apart by creative types until it became what it is today. But due to so many hands attempting to change personas, characters were stuck with simple themes. For example, one can easily come up with the hypothetical conspiracy that Lucas as a Jewish man wanted to identify his characters with the 10 commandments (thou shalt not kill, honor thy father, etc) . Any person with enough effort could draw enough lines to believe that story and I think that Spongebob is simply the same monster.

  4. The video provided to us by Audissey portrays spongebob and his friends/foes as representations of the seven deadly sins. I do agree with this theory, though they do not exclusively exhibit a sin, they are clearly based off of a similar aspect. All of the characters have personalities which are very difficult to misinterpret, a sunny sponge, a sad squid, a very stupid starfish, a cheap crab, and etcetera!

    Though these personalities are easily categorized into the seven deadly sins it does not mean the creators sat down and said, “Hey let’s throw all seven of the deadly sins in here to teach the kids a lesson.” The conversation probably went more like, “We need our characters to have relatable personalities in order to inspire empathy in our audience, and let’s throw some comedy in there f*** it!” This exemplifies how the characters of which we consequently relate to, also have personalities which are inevitably tied to the seven deadly sins. This makes all of us sinners!!!!

    The seven deadly sins are implemented within each character throughout the canterbury tales, and as you read along you begin to see growth from these characters . The appearance of their origins begin to reveal itself through deeper exhibitions, and their true colors surface over time. I agree with Janina when she says ,”…digging deeper into a text can provide a whole new view.” If you are keen enough you can analyze these relationships between the sins and all of the characters.

  5. According to the video, “Are SpongeBob & His Friends Based On The 7 Deadly Sins?” it explains the relative symbolism between the show, “SpongeBob Squarepants,” and the seven deadly sins. Surprisingly, the writer, Stephen Hillenburg, created the show to portray the sins in a deliberate, discreet, and innocent manner. Thus, each character was given certain characteristics to represent a sin.

    In relation to Chaucer’s “Canterbury Tales,” every character – regardless of the Knight, the Parson, and the Plowman – personified a sin or an overlap of sins. To illustrate, in the “Canterbury Tales,” the Doctor symbolized pride because of his intricate speech, his intellectual knowledge, and his fine clothing, whereas in the show, Sandy Cheeks also symbolized pride due to her belittlement towards SpongeBob and Patrick. To add on, the Pardoner embodied greed on account of his deceitful deeds to earn profit, in comparison to Mr. Krabs who also embodied greed as a result of his obsession with money.

    Like Althaea questioned, “What fun is watching the narrative of characters without faults?” If the characters in all films, shows, or stories were impeccable, what is the point of a film or a book? Conflict is the source that maintains the plot of a story enthralling. Although it may sound inappropriate, fortunately, no terrestrial being is flawless.

  6. In the video, “Are Spongebob & His Friends Based On The 7 Deadly Sins?” Emily Carson dives into the theory that the characters on the children’s television show, “Spongebob Squarepants” are based on the seven deadly sins. Emily goes through each character, attaches a sin to them, and explains why they are associated with that sin. Sandy is Pride, Mr. Krabbs is Greed, Patrick is Sloth, Plankton is Envy, Gary is Gluttony, Squidward is Wrath, and Spongebob is Lust. In the video Emily states that a writer on the show, Doug Lawrence and the creator of the show, Stephen Hillenburg have confirmed that the characters are based on the seven deadly sins and that was the original intention. After listening to the points made by Emily and the confirmation from a writer and the actual creator of the show, there is so much compelling evidence that makes me agree with this theory.

    Every character needs to have a background, foundation, or frame to start with. When Hillenburg was creating the characters he needed to base them off of something. The seven deadly sins are a pretty well-known concept in the Western world, so I think Hillenburg knew that people would catch on sooner or later. But keeping in mind that Spongebob Squarepants is a children’s show, he made each character almost an “extreme version” of the sin. This would help children understand that acting like these characters in real life are unrealistic, silly, and only things you would see happen in cartoons. There is so much undeniable evidence that the characters are based off of the seven deadly sins that I don’t see how a person wouldn’t agree. Like Emily said in the video, “Envy is extreme jealousy or desire and Plankton is literally green with it.”

    This information presented about the Spongebob Squarepants characters being based off of the seven deadly sins applies to what we have read in “The Canterbury Tales” because in both cases we are both given characters that exhibit the sins in examples that are universally understable. I like what Althaea said, “..Trying to stray away from these bad habits makes our stories more worthwhile and meaningful.” When we watch Spongebob and his friends or read about the pilgrims in Chaucer’s story, we become aware of ourselves a little more when we relate to the absurd and socially unacceptable antics that are exhibited. When we reflect about our own actions, we create experiences for ourselves to be more worthwhile and meaningful. And when we watch other people stumble in their bad habits, the author is trying to get the readers to pull out the meaningful and worthwhile messages to help us change ourselves. When we watch Squidward be miserable and hate life as he pushes Spongebob and Patrick away, we see a little bit of ourselves in that and think, “Why is Squidward choosing to be miserable and lonely when he has friends inviting him to go with them? Hey maybe I’ll be happier if I let people into my life.” Then we see him enjoy himself a little when he participates in their shenanigans with them and think, “I want that kind of joy in my life, and not grumpy Squidward from the beginning of the episode.” Although television can take examples to extremes and we might not have deep reflection when watching something that reminds us of our childhood, I think those messages are being subtly pushed as Chaucer’s critical opinions were slyly placed in the Canterbury Tales.

  7. Sure, I’ll believe it. However, the same could also be said for just about anything else. If you were to attempt to categorize anyone else you knew into one of the seven deadly sins, you would find that it is not a very arduous task. Everyone you know is guilty of one sin or another. The inhabitants of heaven must be very strange creatures indeed, if they can reside there without sinning. Sin is inescapable. For example, if you have ever worn clothing for reasons other than to cover your naked skin, you are guilty of pride. If you have ever enjoyed the taste of a meal, you are guilty of the sin of gluttony. If you have ever sworn after stubbing your toe on a corner, you are guilty of wrath. If you have ever wanted something that you did not absolutely need, you are guilty of greed. Ever miss a day of church? Sloth. Envy is so painfully obvious when it comes, it might as well be its own punishment. Finally, if you have somehow avoided committing each of the above sins throughout your entire life, then congratulations! You are still guilty of lust, because it was the very force that you were born from. The seven deadly sins are not sins any more than they are archetypes of the human condition. Therefore, anyone could categorize anyone into one of the seven deadly categories and declare thee a miscreant to God. Everyone’s friends are heathens. As Romel put it, “Any person with enough effort could draw enough lines to believe that story and I think that Spongebob is simply the same monster.” The lesson to be learned is not that we should all start living in confession booths and carry around a cat-o-nine tails to flagellate ourselves with regularly, but that sometimes, it is forgivable to indulge oneself. The seven sins only become deadly if you allow them to.

  8. In the video, “Are Spongebob and His Friends Based on The 7 Deadly Sins?” Emily Carson talked about how Spongebob, Patrick, Mr. Krabs, Sandy, Gary, Plankton, and Squidward are all guilty of the 7 deadly sins. She then explains how Spongebob is guilty of Lust, Patrick is guilty of Sloth, Mr. Krabs is guilty of Greed, Sandy is guilty of Pride, Gary is guilty of Gluttony, Plankton is guilty of Envy, and Squidward is guilty of Wrath. I never actually connected the cartoon with the 7 deadly sins until now. I do agree with this theory because not only did the one of writers confirm that it is true, but because so many of the character traits make sense now . I don’t think that the writers wanted to make the show about the 7 deadly sins but I do think that they did want the 7 deadly sins to have some sort of appearance in the series. It applies to the Canterbury Tales because I don’t think I would’ve noticed that the all of the characters in the tales would be guilty of any of the sins of Edwards didn’t tell us about it before reading the prologue.

    I agree with what Althaea questioned, “What fun is watching the narrative of characters without faults?” Stories, tv shows, movies, etc. would be so boring if all the characters in them were perfect all the time. Many people relate to te 7 deadly sins and we relate to the characters which make listening and watching these types of stories so much fun.

  9. In response to the prompt, I do believe that the creators of SpongeBob did this purposely, but for what reason? The characters in the show do represent the sins, but it is something you will not see or understand unless you were taught about the seven sins or at least know of them. I did not really watch SpongeBob throughout my childhood, but after learning about the seven sins, you do see the comparison within these characters. I think the one that shocked me the most was the first one about Sandy representing greed and then after looking at the other characters, it gave me that “SO TRUE!” moment because these characters do relate with the sins. I agree with Janina G. when she stated, “they used the sins as a foundation for creating their characters.” and I absolutely agree because if they did not have this idea on the characters then maybe the show would not be as successful as it is today.

    As for Canterbury Tales, this shows that there can be some shows or even books that may represent the seven deadly sins, but in a secret manner. Imagine if we read Canterbury Tales without learning the sins; this would mean that the story would be a regular story to us from medieval times. But with the knowledge we know of the sins, it helps go deeper into the story and see what and who these characters are. And like Janina G. said, “Therefore this just shows me that sometimes digging deeper into a text can provide a whole new view.”

  10. Spongebob and friends have been with me since the beginning of my youth. The TV introduced it to my older brother, he introduced it to me, the both of us introduced it to our little brother, and now we are showing it to our cousin. Spongebob is one of the shows that can bring a smile to any generation. While this show was with me most of my childhood, the idea of my favorite Bikini Bottom sea creatures being based off the deadly sins seemed surprising. It is not something that a kid thinks about when watching an entertaining sponge flip patties.

    I have been aware of this controversy for some time already. The video helped me regain my thoughts on the Spongebob controversy. After learning “the truth” about all the characters for the first time, no one can help but take a second look at the show. To me, it has always been an observation that I have regarded, but never really questioned. The discovery of the seven deadly sins being found in Spongebob is not all that surprising when one looks at it. While Patrick and Gary may be remembered as memorable in people’s hearts, they are mainly drawn as one dimensional characters.Each character’s most memorable aspect happens to be the detail that describes them as a whole: Mr. Krabs always wanting money, Gary always needing/wanting to be fed, and Plankton always being jealous of Mr. Krabs’ success. It just so happens that their descriptions line up pretty well with each of the seven sins.

    It is pretty unique to see how two different mediums handled the inclusion of the seven deadly sins into their work. While Spongebob wanted express each sin as an exaggerated, yet entertaining personality, Chaucer intended to take a more ambitious route. In his prologue of the Canterbury Tales, Chaucer viewed then seven deadly sins as flaws of a human that prevent them from being perfect. Instead of taking a playful approach to the sins like Spongebob, Chaucer chose to discredit the sinners in his story without being too blatant about it.

    I do not know what the creators were thinking of when they were writing this kind of show. But in the end, I am glad that they did. While the video has provided proof that the creators had intentions to use the seven deadly sins in creating their character, the question still stands: why? I don’t think I can even create a compelling answer for that. But I do applaud Bruce’s guess for going on the route of relatability. It seems to make the most sense for such a crazy show that I can even look back on with a smile: “We need our characters to have relatable personalities in order to inspire empathy in our audience, and let’s throw some comedy in there f*** it!”

  11. In the video, “Are Spongebob and his Friends based on the 7 Deadly Sins”, Emily Carson breaks down the conspiracy theory of how Spongebob and his friends each relate to the seven deadly sins.

    To address the prompt, I do agree that the Spongebob characters are slightly based off of the seven deadly sins since there is no way possible that this was just all one big coincidence. In the video, one of the writers of the show, Doug Lawrence, even states that this was definitely intentional and each main character was based off of the deadly sins as this was what Stephen Hillenburg, the creator of the show, intended, but to an extent. The sins are not the main focus of the show, it is just to portray the characters by giving them personality and purpose. Without incorporating the seven deadly sins, the characters would be without flaws and there really would not be a story to tell if everything and everyone was “perfect”. Using the sins was simply a way to generate the show’s interesting plots.

    This information applies to Canterbury Tales for the same reasons, to give the pilgrims a personality and for the story to be entertaining. I agree with Althaea L. when she states, “Like Spongebob Squarepants, the Canterbury Tales blended the characteristics of the seven deadly sins in almost all the characters of his tale.” and to add on, each character from both subjects involved imperfect characters to make for an interesting read/watch. Even when we were told to find the three “perfect” characters, their stories were not as interesting as those who were not.

  12. The video that Audissey has used describes how Spongebob Squarepants may be in a way tied with the seven deadly sins. All the main characters represent a sin. Spongebob is lust, Sandy is pride, Mr. Crabs is greed, Squidward is wrath, Patrick is sloth and lastly, Gary is gluttony. The video gave compelling reasons as to why this may be true but in reality, does it really mean they represent them? The only two characters where I really don’t see a connection with the sins is Spongebob and Gary. Spongebob representing lust seems to far fetched because, lust is having feelings of a sexual manner but Spongebob doesn’t show that. Also, Gary is a pet snail who cannot fend for himself, Spongebob needs to care for him so Gary representing gluttony doesn’t seem to be accurate. Yes, in the video the creator says that they are loosely based on them to give the show an interesting view but, it’s a children’s show and no child would understand or see the connections with the characters or the deadly sins. I agree with Jadalynn with the characters being in a way some what potrade by the sins and isn’t the main focus of the show and not promoting them. In the end, I don’t see Spongbob or his friends being truely based off of the seven deadly sins.

  13. Channel Frederator created a video analyzing the possibility of SpongeBob Squarepants representing the seven deadly sins. The video creator supports this claim through the characters. Each main characters is inspired by the deadly sins. Spongebob represents lust, because he loves peoples too much. Money hungry Mr. Krabs is greed, while award winning Patrick Star received recognition for is slothness. The video goes on to label the sin each character seems to be inspired by. At the end, the host presents evidence from the creators themselves proving the conspiracy to be true.

    Emily quotes writer Doug Lawrence’s commentary of season one. In the commentary he explains that the characters are based off the deadly sins, and was done purposely. That comment coming from a creator validates the conspiracy completely, making it… not really a conspiracy anymore. Anyhow I did have doubts about the conspiracy, mainly because of Emily herself. Her unsureness when labeling Gary and Gluttony made me question her understanding of the sins. When drawing connection between the pet snail and the sin, she used phrases like “I guess it could.” That phrase harmed the validity of her findings to me. It wasn’t till actually hearing that the creators did in fact draw from the sins, that I agreed with the conspiracy that the main characters were based of of the seven deadly sins?

    I agree with Janina when she says,“…this information applies to what we have read in the Canterbury Tales through the concept of analysing.” While preparing for the AP English Composition exam, Ms. Hernandez taught me to look beneath the surface of a work and draw connections. Analyzing is a skill that helps a reader understand the intent of a creator. This video reminded me of the one story; the idea that no work is 100% original.

  14. After watching the video entitled “Are SpongeBob and His Friends based on the 7 Deadly Sins?” I have come to the conclusion that I do not believe this conspiracy theory. Although conspiracy theories are one of my favorite things to learn about and I heavily believe in some pretty outrageous theories, to me this one was over exaggerated. In my opinion if you try hard enough you can pretty much connect any character from a cartoon or a TV show to the seven deadly sins because they are so universal. I agree with Romel when he stated, “Any person with enough effort could draw enough lines to believe that story and I think that SpongeBob is simply the same monster.” Like we learned in class, there are so many different actions, thoughts, professions, etc. that can be related back to the deadly sins, so taking a show and connecting certain actions they have done to the sins is not too hard of a task to accomplish. Yes this idea is right in theory, but I truly do not believe the creators of this show had the intention from the start to make each character represent a sin, and if they did they could have done a way better job with certain characters. In the end the seven deadly sins are just a list of things that are pretty much unavoidable for the most part and the idea that a children’s TV show was solely based on this list of sins is quite a stretch.

  15. In the video “Are SpongeBob and His Friends based on the 7 Deadly Sins?”, it states that each character in SpongeBob is based on the seven deadly sins. Many people believe in this theory and many people disagree. I disagree with samara when she said ” Although conspiracy theories are one of my favorite things to learn about and I heavily believe in some pretty outrageous theories, to me this one was over exaggerated.” I disagree with this statement because I do not think it is over exaggerated.
    The man reason why I believe that each character is based on the seven deadly sins is because each character exaggerates on his/her sin. For example, Patrick is a very lazy person but what the creators did was exaggerate how lazy he was. As it says in the video that Patrick even won an award for being lazy. Another example is Mr. Krabs. After watching a couple of episodes, it is obvious that he is very greedy. This is one of the main reasons why I believe that the characters are based on the seven deadly sins. This reminds me of the prologue of the Canterbury tales. In the prologue, Chaucer only made three perfect characters and the rest were committing a sin and nobody who read it knew.

  16. I do believe that spongebob and the other main characters are based off of the seven deadly sins. Even the author of the show mentions in an interview that he had done this intentionally. I think that the creators did this to add personality to the characters and to give them imperfections. We as the audience like to see characters that experience hardships and overcome them not perfect people that never have anything go wrong in their life; people want to be able to relate with the characters. Just as Jaydalynn said, “Without incorporating the seven deadly sins, the characters would be without flaws and there really would not be a story to tell if everything and everyone was “perfect”.”

    This applies to what we have read about the Canterbury Tales because it adds depth the characters and doesn’t keep them one dimensional. The adding of personalities shows that what lies on the surface does not necessarily dictate what lies underneath; for example, the Friar was a man that cheated people out of money in exchange for their sins being forgiven, but he looked like this kind, poor priest. By adding the seven deadly sins into both these stories, both authors were able to show that not all people are perfect and that is what makes them interesting; for if everyone was perfect and nothing bad ever happened to them then life would be boring.

  17. To consider the prompt, I somewhat agree to an extent with Audissey H.’s assertion of the seven deadly sins prevalent in Spongebob, the television series that many have adored and loved. Yes, the writers may have implemented the seven deadly sins for character development such as in influence, but there is speculation of so. As Collin E. expressed in his viewpoint, “If you were to attempt to categorize anyone else you knew into one of the seven deadly sins, you would find that it is not a very arduous task.” There is no clear explanation of the characters of the show that define or is an archetype of the seven deadly sins. If there is, how come it’s these specific seven characters? Larry the Lobster is guilty of pride and sloth; he is regularly and exclusively focused on his physique and nothing else. What about Pearl? Always whining to her father, Eugene Krabs, to buy the latest trends for her so she can “fit in” with her friends, which is the sin of greed by the way. As a matter of fact, anyone in the Bikini Bottom can be labeled as sinner of the seven deadly sins and I can observe as this as a coincidence. I mention Collin E. once more, “Therefore, anyone could categorize anyone into one of the seven deadly categories and declare thee a miscreant to God.” Consequently, I still believe this show is delicate and subtle in my late teenage years. Anyone or anything, existential or not, can be classed to one or more of the deadly sins, including the show we enjoyed in the development of our childhood.

  18. After watching the video, “Are Spongebob & His Friends Based On The 7 Deadly Sins?” I have come to agree with the theory that Spongebob and the other main characters are based on the seven deadly sins. Before watching this video I would had never thought about this theory but now that I have seen it, it has changed my view on some characters. I agree, because some of the characters’ sins are very clear like Patrick, his sin is sloth which anyone who has seen the show would agree that he is lazy. Plankton is another character that it is easy to identify their sin because in most episodes he is trying to steal the secret formula from Mr. Krabs, which shows how envious he is of Mr. Krabs’ successful business. In the video, even the creators said that they did it purposely. I agree with Maryela when she said, “I think that the creators did this to add personality to the characters and to give them imperfections.” I agree with her because if each character was perfect the show would be much less interesting, which is more of a reason the creators would have done this intentionally. This information applies to the Canterbury Tales because in the prologue it is a description of each Pilgrim and it shows their sin which is exactly what the video did.

  19. In the short video entitled, “Are Spongebob & His Friends Based On The 7 Deadly Sins? – Cartoon Conspiracy” discusses the similarities that the popular cartoon characters from Spongebob Squarepants share with the seven deadly sins. The video provides explanations, and evidence to support the theory that there is a correlation between the characters in the show and the seven deadly sins. The video then goes on to state each of the characters and what sin they portray: Spongebob represents lust, Mr. Crabs represents greed, Sandy represents pride, Patrick represents sloth, Squidward represents wrath, Plankton represents envy, and lastly Gary represents gluttony.

    I agree with this theory that the main characters in Spongebob Squarepants are based on the seven deadly sins because, one of the writers of the show named Doug Lawrence, confirmed that the characters were in fact based of the seven deadly sins. Jaydalynn states, “The sins are not the main focus of the show, it is just to portray the characters by giving them personality and purpose”. I agree with this statement because the show would be uninteresting if the characters did not have some sort of flaw. Almost every show out there has characters that hold similarities to the seven deadly sins because, nobody is perfect. This information applies to the Canterbury Tales because, most of the characters represents one of the seven deadly sins in order to make the story more entertaining to read.

  20. I believe that you can not call this a theory since the woman on the video said that in an interview the creators of Spongebob said it was based on the Seven Deadly Sins. But I still agree in this conspiracy. It has enough evidence to proves its point on why it has people or things represent each sin or more. This not includes the main characters of Spongebob, but also the minor characters that appear a couple of times and some that appeared once. Also Collin said, “If you were to attempt to categorize anyone else you knew into one of the seven deadly sins, you would find that it is not a very arduous task.” I believe this much is true, but you must have some background knowledge to be able to tell what character specialize in one of the Seven Sins.

    Like the woman on the video said about an interview with the creator of Spongebob. It was intentionally based on the Seven Deadly Sins. Each character has a characteristic of how they are committing one of the Deadly Sins. This information applies to the Canterbury Tales by showing how each character in a story had a characteristic of a sin. How there were only three characters that were considered “perfect” because they were not committing a sin.

  21. In the YouTube video, “Are Spongebob & His Friends Based on the 7 Deadly Sins?” The video’s host shares a popular conspiracy theory among creators and connoisseur of the cartoon industry. Spongebob, an extremely popular children’s television program on the Nickelodeon Network is a staple of many American’s childhoods. However, the video points out that the charismatic sponge and his friends might have some deeper meaning.

    The video explains the parallelisms, a sort of intertextuality between the popular children’s cartoon and the Catholic Church’s seven deadly sins. The video describes how each character is related or portrays characteristics of an individual sin. After the video’s presentation of connections between the two, I one-hundred percent believe in this conspiracy. However, I do not even know if it is that much of a conspiracy because the shows creator went on the record and stated that this was an intentional move on his behalf – conspiracy confirmed!

    I agree with Maryela when she says that this relates back to the Canterbury Tales because it adds depth to the characters. I personally believe that these sins are what makes for an interesting character. These attributes do indeed give depth to the story – they make the characters relatable because we see that they too are fallible and thus causes a greater connection with the audience. Sure, I do not think a child would fully be able to comprehend that “Plankton” is envious or “Sandy” is prideful – as the video described. Moreover, there is much more to them than meets the eye and I think this is true for many other shows as well. These 7 deadly sins go way deeper than just Spongebob Squarepants – they hold true to our society. We are the ones who give these sins their power, in many cases in popular culture we describe lust as love, pride or greed as success, or wrath as power. This video has made me want to take a deeper look into how the Canterbury Tales is still relevant today.

  22. In response to the prompt of whether I believe the conspiracy that the Spongebob characters are based on the seven deadly sin or not, yes, of course, I do because one of the creators of the show said it was. Nick said it best when he said, “ That comment coming from a creator validates the conspiracy completely, making it… not really a conspiracy anymore.” Romel believes that the characters were not created with the intention of representing the sins because the network would not have allowed it. I believe when he said, “Reason being, that Nickelodeon would never agree to such a show premise.” That makes sense but to say that the creators did not have in mind where they wanted to go with the characters and their just does not make sense. The characters have always acted the same throughout the series. Patrick being lazy, Squidward wrathful, Spongebob lustful, etc.

  23. The conspiracy theory that this video explains is the prevalence of the seven deadly sins in the kids TV show known as Spongebob. After reading over some of my classmates’ comments on their opinions on this conspiracy, I noticed that there was a bit of confusion as to how the sins are actually applied on the show. Some people mentioned that they do not believe the show is based off the seven deadly sins, an opinion on which I agree with. However, it is important to note that the video mentioned that the conspiracy does not claim that the show is about the seven deadly sins, but that the sins are used as a way to portray the characters.

    The conspiracy also maintains that the writers of the show intended for their characters to be modeled after the seven deadly sins; this I disagree with. It seems unlikely to me that a kids TV network would produce a show knowing that it is explicitly based on religious vices. A TV network as popular as Nickelodeon would not risk their business by allowing for a children’s show to be aired based on these religious ideas.

    I have concluded that this Spongebob conspiracy is not persuading enough for me because the seven deadly sins are very generic and can be applied to most characters of any TV show, film, or novel. Just as Samara stated, “If you try hard enough you can pretty much connect any character from a cartoon or a TV show to the seven deadly sins because they are so universal.” Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales Prologue is a piece of literature, which was intended to show the faults of his characters in a satirical manner. Most of his characters were guilty of at least one deadly sin, with the exception of three perfect characters. The diversity of his characters demonstrates that the deadly sins are applicable to almost any character, regardless of occupation or social class.

    Just as daily horoscopes based on zodiac signs are incredibly generic, so are the deadly sins. Therefore, I maintain that the Spongebob Seven Deadly Sins conspiracy is not convincing.

  24. The seven deadly sins are a very interesting topic in themselves, but whether they can be incorporated or interpreted in a children’s cartoon is a very intriguing topic. Spongebob Squarepants is an old cartoon and one of my personal favorites from my childhood. But I personally believe that the show had in no way been created based on the seven deadly sins. It may have been influenced but I don’t think the creators may have wanted to expose children to a deep and dark concept. I also agree with Romel when he says that the network would not have allowed the Spongebob cartoon to air. The cartoon must have broken down in order to see if its worthy/appropriate to be on a children’s cartoon channel. But the only real connection between Spongebob and the Canterbury Tales is the similarities in the characters, there really is no firm evidence that Spongebob is based on the Seven Deadly Sins and its really unlikely.

  25. “To capture an audience, find the thing that makes them them and call it art. Capture them though a story, a song, or a sonnet. Capture an audience through a movie, a five minute clip, or a show about a sponge living in a pineapple under the sea. Then, have each of the characters represent the sins everyone is guilty of without making it too obvious.”

    That’s roughly what I imagine the creators of Spongebob said as they were creating the show. That being said, I agree with the conspiracy explained in the video, “Are Spongebob & His Friends Based on the 7 Deadly Sins?” I think each represents one of the deadly sins because beside the fact that one of the creators of the show right out admitted to the conspiracy, each character is too guilty of a sin. It’s so obvious and exaggerated, that as viewers we dismiss it as inconsequential.

    What we don’t realize however is that this show is just another example that highlights our human faults without being offensive about it. In fact, we laugh when we sit in front of the television just as people probably laughed when reading Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales. In a more subconscious level though, as Chanel said, “When we watch Spongebob and his friends or read about the pilgrims in Chaucer’s story, we become aware of ourselves a little more when we relate to the absurd and socially unacceptable antics that are exhibited.” As a result, the creators of these art pieces have succeeded in being satirical and creating a more aware audience.

  26. He lives in a pineapple under the sea, and in my heart. Spongebob Squarepants was and is a huge part of many millennial children’s childhoods. As a child who grew up watching the show, I never would have guessed that my beloved children’s television show turned out to be based on the seven deadly sins.
    As someone who is currently reading The Inferno by Dante Alighieri, I would never have guessed that the book and Spongebob have any correlation. But then again, the show is only loosely based on the sins. The characters are not complete and direct representations of them, except for possibly Mr. Krabs and Patrick. I do not completely agree with the statement that the all ot the characters are based off of the seven deadly sins. The sins are more apparent in a few of the character, but for the most part, the sins are used as an inspiration for the characters.
    It is clear that the creators did intentionally use the sins as inspiration for the characters. The video by ChannelFrederator, states that the characters are, in fact, based on the deadly sins. It is clearly stated so when the video mentions an interview with one of the writers of Spongebob Squarepants who solidified the theory of the character’s source of inspiration.
    In response to the last question of the prompt, the information provided in the video does not really apply to what we have read in The Canterbury Tales. The only correlation between The Canterbury Tales and Spongebob Squarepants is that the characters are based off of the seven deadly sins. The Canterbury Tales is not inspired by the seven deadly sins, rather the characters themselves represent the sins. That is also partially true for Spongebob Squarepants. Chaucer’s stories have the sins as a much more stronger source of inspiration than Spongebob, but that mostly has to do with the audiences for the shows.
    While yes, I agree Spongebob Squarepants is loosely based off of the seven deadly sins, it is only based off of facts that I believe in this “theory”. The writers clearly stated that the characters are based off of the sins, so for me to say that I disagree would be the same as if I said the sky is green. It would be wrong of me to disagree with the person who literally created the characters. The video is not so much a theory, but a short video stating or affirming a fact. I give kudos to the people who were able to connect the dots, because I for sure would have never thought of it. But then again, I watched the show for simple entertainment, not to philosophically analyze it. People are always able to connect dots if they try hard enough. It is like what Collin said, “anyone could categorize anyone into one of the seven deadly categories and declare thee a miscreant to God”.

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