Blog #13

Hello North House! I hope you all had a swell break with little to none awkward conversations about politics on Thanksgiving. Also, I apologize for posting the blog a day later. But there’s no need to focus on the past while we are in the present.

While we are focusing on the present, I would like to talk about a subject that should much more attention today, but is ignored. For your blog, I picked a video about gendered marketing.

Most of us do not realize it, but the market is unnecessarily divided. For those of you who have not noticed, many of the household products advertised have two different versions: one for men and another for women. But why do we need two versions of the exact same product?

For this blog, I have three different prompts. Two of the prompts will be gender specific, but if you feel you can answer prompt feel free to respond to it. Please indicate what prompt you are responding to at the top of your post.

Prompt #1

If you buy more female marketed products, do you feel the pink colors and more “feminine” packaging makes you more inclined to buy a product? Do you feel gendered packaging is necessary? Do you feel it is are fair? Would you mind if were to disappear?

Prompt #2

If you buy more male marketed products, do you feel the blue colors and more “masculine” packaging makes you more inclined to buy a product? Do you feel gendered packaging is necessary? Do you feel it is are fair? Would you mind if were to disappear?

Prompt #3 

If you buy a mix of, or more gender neutral products, do you purchase them for practicality or aesthetic preferences? Does the gendered marketing persuade you to buy a product catered to your gender? Do you care for the gendered packaging? Would you mind if they were to disappear?

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28 thoughts on “Blog #13

  1. In response to Rocky’s second prompt: up until this exact moment I have never once questioned whether my affinity for purchasing merchandise is more masculine or feminine. Thankfully, unlike 99% percent of the U.S I can purchase a towel without worrying whether I am enabling so called “gender norms” or trying to establish an evil hate dominated patriarchy. It’s of course a hyperbole but it seems less and less of a joke to me as even the smallest molehills are turned into mountains.This is all largely due to a rise of “Victimhood Culture” that is being explored by sociologists and will likely define our generation for years to come- but that is another story for another day. What we are focusing on today is gender, and if I am forced to answer whether I feel more inclined to buy a manly product my answer is simple. Yes. I will be the first to say that by large and far I will prefer a product that is advertised as blue over one that is pink or even gray. I will naturally be drawn to more manly smells in my hygienic products, drawn toward manly themes in books and drawn toward items designated for men. Nowadays, it’s almost shameful to say “I am proud to be a man”. Which is quite saddening to see, especially as a brisk aficionado for testosterone infused men throughout history. I am by no means anywhere close to the likeness of Jack London, Ernest Hemingway or Theodore Roosevelt, but to shame a generation into thinking that these men should not be aspired to is downright noxious.

    So, do I feel gender packaging is useful? Absolutely. After all we are simply an embodiment of everything we consume, no? If I spend all my money on alcohol am I not a drunk? Similarly, if I spend all my money and time on charity am I not a saint to some extent? My point lies in the fact that packaging gives a sense of identity. There are many items in most supermarkets in the U.S that sell gender neutral items-and they are not hard to find. But if we do away with gender packaging…well, let’s say it is hard to reinforce an identity when every consumable good on the planet is without color or distinguishable quality.

    As for pricing an item more based off a person’s sex, that is absurd. Nonetheless, this concept is one that has existed for dozens of years with the rise of a branch of economics called: behavioral economics. In behavioral economics, sociologists tap into our inner primate to discover what will maximize profit. In the case of pricing a sex more than another, this simply means that behaviorists have simply found that on average a woman is willing to pay more for a product than a man. In studies conducted in the early 40’s men were more likely to not buy a pricey item despite the appeal, where woman were more likely to disregard the price for the appeal. So really, behavioral economics are just taking as much as they can because they understand our innermost desires. So even if say any and all gender products were discarded or seized, there will always be a way to leverage profit out of society. And believe it or not, this is not intrinsically bad so-to-speak. If American’s buy more and keep money circulating that might very well mean an improved economy.

    But unfortunately, less and less we are seeing less of this long term thinking and rather the accumulation of what is the problem now. In a generation where the word “selfie” has become a point of pride, one has to wonder whether we are spending too much time dealing with molehills and not bracing ourselves for impact in the future.

  2. Prompt #1:

    In the video, “Gender Marketing”, both Kirsten Drysdale and Zoe Lodge discuss the concept of market segmentation breaking it down into the smaller category of how marketed products cater to the gender spectrum. In the marketing world today, the color pink is considered more feminine while the color blue is more masculine. Personally, I never truly realized and acknowledged that I purchase more female marketed products, it is more of a subconscious feeling to me. I mindlessly just look for what I needed regardless of what gender it was made for, but that typically always ended up being a “feminine” product. I am not sure if the pink colors and other feminine aspects are really what incline me to buy the products or if I am just used to getting my products in the same area each time for as long as I can remember.

    From the business standpoint, gendered packaging is a phenomenal idea as they are gaining more revenue as stated in the video, “It is not just trying to sell more, it is about trying to charge more too. If the products are the same, then what is the point of making two, three or ten of the same item? These packaging tactics are not necessary at all, it is just always about gaining more money and it is clearly working. However, this has been going on for so long, so I understand that it allows some people to feel like they have a place in society, as if they belong to a category. As Romel M. put it, “My point lies in the fact that packaging gives a sense of identity. There are many items in most supermarkets in the U.S that sell gender neutral items-and they are not hard to find. But if we do away with gender packaging…well, let’s say it is hard to reinforce an identity when every consumable good on the planet is without color or distinguishable quality.”

    When trying to understand this situation from different viewpoints, I do see how it would be unfair, but no one is actually forcing you to buy one product over the other, it is just personal preference. If you are a female, no one is stopping you from buying a male product or a gender neutral product, and vice versa. You can’t please everyone. Society today has very set idea of everyone having their own set of things which I do not mind at all because that honestly just opens up to more options I can choose from. I also would not mind at all if they were to disappear since it is not a major concern for me. As long as I can buy the things I need regardless of what the packaging looks like I will be fine. It is not the end of the world.

  3. Prompt #2

    “The world isn’t black and white – it’s pink and blue!” Why are the products distinguished by “soft” or “bold” colors, “round” or “squared” images, or “feminine” or “masculine” labels? According to the short video, “Gendered Marketing⎜The Checkout,” it is due to market segmentation, which divides consumers into smaller groups to promote the wealth of companies. In terms of companies, they profit from producing various gender products, whereas in terms of the people, they are deceived by either the colors or labels of the products.

    Society has instilled the notion that dark, bold colors pertain more to men and light, soft colors to women. To add on, it has established the clear idea of gender-related descriptions such as “for MEN” or “for WOMEN.” Thus, I am more inclined to purchase a “masculine” product.

    Overall, I believe gendered packaging is not necessary because it is unfair for the people. Many companies are creating products that are suitable for both genders, but to “score a 25% increase in revenue globally” or to “contribute driving the market up,” they produce specific gender-related products and increase the costs of them. For instance, in the video, the toothpaste brand, Signal, was initially designed “for the whole family.” Then, the company produced a version for men and women. Furthermore, the expense for the men’s toothpaste increased “40% more,” while the women’s toothpaste increased “70% more.” Although companies benefit considerably from this process, it degrades the trust of the people.

    If the concept of market segmentation were to disappear, I would not mind. Like Jadalynn stated, “As long as I can buy the things I need regardless of what the packaging looks like I will be fine.” There is no need to create products for different genders. In the end, most of the products are similar; they are just inconspicuous.

  4. Prompt 3:
    In the video, Gender Marketing, it describes the difference in selling both female and male products that are the same. The only difference is packaging and what is said on the labels. Females think they have to buy the stuff wrapped in pink with flowers and males think that they have to buy the stuff that says “for men” only. It really doesn’t matter if the packaging is different because overall, the product that is wrapped in two different packages and labeled differently, is the same product. I am subject to both buying products that are pushed for females to buy and yet there are some products that I purchase that are meant for males. Of course the more essentials that a female needs I would buy that is packaged with the pretty flowers but then the nonessentials I wouldn’t mind buying the products meant for males. I feel it all boils down to wither some people are confident with themselves to buy products that aren’t meant for the gender. I don’t feel that the gendered marketing persuades me to by a product catered to my gender but there are certain products that I do buy that are only specified for females. I wouldn’t care if the gendered packaging disappeared because, it is just a product that someone uses. It’s not like someone is going to look at you and say something rude because you buy something that isn’t packaged for your gender. I agree with Benji when he states that gendered packaging is unfair for the people. It wouldn’t seem fair if a female wants to purchase something that is meant for a male but may be looked at differently because she bought it. Same goes for males. In the end, gendered packaging is just another way for the big companies to suck the money out of our pockets.

  5. Prompt #1

    Ever since I was young I was always given the Disney Princess pink bedsheets, female versions of hygiene products, and had mostly pink toys. The only toys I had that were not dolls or hued in feminine colors and patterns were Legos. Needless to say, there was nothing wrong with owning the feminized version of the product but I was denied the option of having a tool set, to build a Bionicle, or wanting the blue version of a Nintendo just because it was marked for boys. Even ToysRus organized their toys by gender which I think limits younger kids options. So what if a boy wants a pink housecleaning playset or a girl wants an action figure?

    Besides products for children the video, “Gender Marketing” also elaborated money is the main reason why products are sectioned by gender. People feel more inclined to buy a product if it is meant for them and companies use this fact to their advantage. I think it is unfair that companies increase the price of men’s products and reduced the size of women’s despite the products being exactly similar to each other. I agree with Benjamin T. statement, “most of the products are similar; they are just more inconspicuous.” Even though one product is marketed for a specific gender the interest it holds to a consumer increases by marketing to gender fragility not for any specific benefit only one gender can have. I would not mind if feminine products were to disappear because no matter what gender a product appeals to it does the same job.

  6. In the video, “Gender Marketing” the two main personalities, Kirsten Drysdale and Zoe Lodge discuss corporations’ impact through market segmentation to increase profits. The video stated that, gender is more of a spectrum and should not be defined by societal views of products being more masculine or feminine based solely on their packaging or overall aesthetic.

    In response to Rocky’s third prompt, I think recently I have been purchasing more gender-neutral products, because, of their practicality, specifically with skin care products. A recent example is body lotion. Since I am a darker skin color, when I get out of a hot shower, my skin tends to get ashy and dry making body lotion a necessary part of my daily routine. Generally, I prefer a lotion with a much smoother scent or no scent at all. I tend to stray away from “men’s” lotion and “women’s” lotion, because, I do not want to go about my day smelling like “Almond Musk” or “Sweat Pea.” However, just recently I found the perfect body lotion from Kiehl’s that is advertised as a women’s product. However, it’s functionality and quality was just what I was looking for – it’s rich and not greasy! I don’t care if my Kiehl’s, Creme de Corps body lotion is marketed for women, it gets the job done. Another product that I use regularly is face masks, even though it seems ninety-nine percent of the time they are either being marketed towards women or have a woman on the packaging. The point of a mask is to bring nutrients to the skin and extract impurities and I have no problem using them even if Jennifer Anniston is on the cover of the box.

    Personally, I would not mind if gender-related packaging would be discontinued, because maybe some certain people would stop buying products just because of the gender it says it’s intended for on the label. At the end of the day, products come down to their practicality and quality. For Mothers’ day, I got my mother this anti-ageing eye serum from Kiehl’s that was specifically marked for men; because, after comparing the ingredients to Kiehl’s anti-ageing eye serum that was marketed towards women, the ingredients were virtually identical – the only difference being the women’s was nearly twenty dollars more. I also admit, I’m a firm supporter of Uggs even though at times they might not be socially acceptable. However, all the Ugg boots I own are a classic style, in gender neutral colors that can either be men’s or women’s. However, I purchase them in the women’s department because they are only one-hundred fifty dollars when in the men’s they’re nearly two-hundred dollars for the exact same black slipper.

    At the end of the day, gender-specific packaging and marketing shouldn’t matter if they are the same and serve a definite purpose, that’s all that counts. I agree with Jessica when she says, “gendered packaging is just another way for the big companies to suck the money out of our pockets.” Because, in a sense, corporations such as Kiehl’s and Ugg are sneakily taking advantage of the consumer.

  7. In response to prompt #1, I would feel more inclined to buy feminine products because then I know that there would be an opposite product for men say for shampoo, and I wouldn’t want to wash my hair with a masculine scent I would rather smell like flowers or something fruity cause I like that better. I don’t think it is necessary and I wouldn’t be devastated if it went away, but at an economical standpoint I think it is a brilliant idea and a smart business move because as we learned last year for our green fest project, that we need to look at our audience to market the best way we can and that is what all those companies are doing. By advertising to a specific gender they make products that appeal to them which creates a sense of comradery when seeing a product that aligns with their gender thinking that it was made especially for women or men thinking that it must be better than the average or opposite product. The video also clearly stated that company’s revenues went up when they split it by gender and they made a lot more money. I think that what they are doing isn’t harming anyone in spliting the gender marketing is fair game, but I think that changing the prices for essentially the same product is not fair. Though I knew companies sometimes made the same product for both genders, I did not know that the prices were different and now that I know, I will be more apt to look through the men’s products to see both sides in order to save money. I agreed with Chris when he said, “At the end of the day, gender-specific packaging and marketing shouldn’t matter if they are the same and serve a definite purpose, that’s all that counts.”

  8. Prompt 1:

    Growing up everything I played with was pink. When I asked my parents if I could paint my room blue, they refused because it was a “boy color.” Until this day I have a pink room. All of my life I have been marketed towards buying products that were pink or had feminine packaging, so I would say that yes I am more inclined to buy a product that is marketed towards me.

    The video gives many examples of products that are the same, but are made separately because of the gendered packaging: razors, body soap, and even hair pills! I do not think that products that are the exact same need to have gendered packaging. It’s outrageous for either of the genders to have to pay a different price for the same product based on packaging. The video explains that the only reason that companies do this is to gain more profit from selling the same product in different versions. The company that makes Legos has made so much profit just because they made “girl Legos” and “boy Legos.” Splitting the market wasn’t to cater to “feminine and masculine needs” but only to make more money off of each product. There might be some products that might need to be made certain ways based on the way people’s bodies are built, but it’s completely unfair for consumers to pay different prices for the same exact product.

    I agree with Jessica when she says, “It wouldn’t seem fair if a female wants to purchase something that is meant for a male but may be looked at differently because she bought it. Same goes for males.” The companies that divide their products based on gender create a negative stereotype for buying the “wrong” type of shampoo or razor. If companies just made products that were gender neutral then these problems wouldn’t arise. Not only is it unfair to have different prices for the same product, but it’s also unfair to be shamed because a woman bought a razor meant for men. I don’t think I would mind if gendered packaging disappeared. I would probably have to adjust to buying my products though since it has been ingrained in my mind to buy products with more feminine packaging.

  9. Prompt #7
    I personally don’t believe that the colors and the femininity of the package make me more inclined to buy the product. I think that if a person likes that type of toy they will buy it no matter the style of the packages. Sure, it may contribute more to a person liking the item, but the true reason for a person to buy or be inclined to buy a product is the the item inside the box. Just like Jaydalynn mentioned, “When trying to understand this situation from different viewpoints, I do see how it would be unfair, but no one is actually forcing you to buy one product over the other, it is just personal preference.”

    I don’t think that gender packaging is necessary because there are girls that like toys typically correlated with boys and vice versa. I think we have adapted into a new era where we are not discriminating people for not following societal gender roles. Gender packaging has become something we ignore and somewhat unnecessary since we don’t carry those same gender role values as before.

  10. Prompt 2:
    Personally, I would not go out of my way to specifically look for the “FOR MEN” bottle of shampoo. For things like soap, I found that to be insane because I personally love Dove soap and it’s not like I have to announce it to the world. I hadn’t realized how bad these marketing techniques were getting until the video pointed them out, for example, the “Dove: +Men Care.” It’s sad to think that people feel the need to buy a certain product because “it’s made for them” when in reality you should be buying things because you like the way it smells, looks, or feels. To answer the question if blue makes me more inclined to buy a product no it absolutely does not. If I like a product I will purchase and use it, what does it matter if it does not correspond with your gender if you want to keep something like that to yourself then don’t tell anyone, Maryela said it best, “ I think that if a person likes that type of toy they will buy it no matter the style of the packages.” I believe that to be completely true people should not feel pressured that if they buy something it has to be for their gender.

  11. Prompt #2
    I agree with Benjamin when he said” I believe gendered packaging is not necessary because it is unfair for the people.” I agree with this because companies try to suck up as much money from you by using gendered packaging. They do their best to confuse the buyer by saying that one product is specifically for men or women, but in reality there is hardly a difference. In the video they talked about how the company dove created a “Dove:+ Men Care.” In my opinion, the regular dove soap is perfectly fine. I would not go out and only buy dove for men because it says it is for men. For years I have been using the regular dove soap and nothing is going to change.

    Gender packaging is use when it comes for toys. They perfectly explain how each toy should only be for girls or for each toy should only be for boys. This is how they confuse a girl to only buy Barbie dolls and confuse boys to only buy trucks and cars. I believe that this is unfair because a girl should be able to buy a boy toy is she pleases. To answer the prompt gendered packaging does not have a big affect on my decisions when buying a product.

  12. Prompt #2
    When I go to the store and see pink packaging or cute packaging I do feel like those are the products for me and for my gender because I grew up with that and I know that those products smell feminine. I do feel inclined to buy those sometimes but I normally go for the cheaper products, so if I find lotion that’s cheaper and smells like cologne but is for men, I’d much rather buy the male product. I didn’t learn to do that until I was in middle school. Before that, I was used to buying every product that was pink. My parents would always dress me in pink or light pastel colors because that’s what society would tell them and myself to do. I don’t think gendered products are really necessary because they’re the same products and they have the same affect on all genders so I don’t really see the point in it. I used to think that it was a way of telling you that the pink products are the ones that smelled nice for girls, but I wouldn’t mind if the gendered packaging went away because I could easily just open up the product and smell it myself and I also don’t mind the smell of cologne. I also hate that women products are usually more expensive than male products when they have the same affect just different colors and different smells.

    I agree with what the two women say in the video when they talk about how we are raised and taught from a young age that blue is for boys and pink is for girls. I would say that I don’t mind it because my favorite color is pink, but maybe it was because I was raised that way. I don’t see why it is such a big deal for boys to wear pink and girls to wear blue in today’s society.

    I agree with what Maryela says, “… there are girls that like toys typically correlated with boys and vice versa.” I think kids are too young to know the difference but society or parents tell them that gendered products are a thing.

  13. Honestly, I’m looking at the price of a product more than anything. I’m so pragmatic that if I had trouble staying awake, I’d sooner prick myself with a needle than bother with making a cup of coffee. Does something blue or packaged as masculine attract me to that product more? No, not really, I couldn’t care less. Isaac captures my level of indifference very well in his post where he says, “Personally, I would not go out of my way to specifically look for the “FOR MEN” bottle of shampoo.” However, if another product is made to look extra fruity, I would be lying if I didn’t say I was more averted from one extreme than the other. In truth, edgy, testosterone-filled, manly-man oriented products are just cringeworthy, in the same way that kid that wears snapbacks, pants that are too large, and drinks nothing but monster is cringeworthy. However, even moreso would be the frilly, pink, sunshine and rainbows wrapped products. I don’t doubt most males with any awareness would be embarrassed to be caught with something like that. Unless they had a very good excuse, of course. Capitalism has done very well in bringing us products so toxic that no one on the opposite side would be caught dead with. Realistically, if gendered packaging were to disappear, very few would miss it.

  14. Prompt 3
    On a personal level, I don’t give two hoots what I buy whether it being a “boy” or “girl” item. If it works, it works. If the product is labeled shampoo, I buy it with no regard even if it’s a female one. This could be due to the fact of having a family with mostly girls causing me to affect my perception, but my opinion is not a reflection of everyone. To take into account, I particularly agree with Collin E‘s viewpoint, “Honestly, I’m looking at the price of a product more than anything.” The very two factors I weigh upon choosing a product would be these: price and effectiveness. The value of such affects the durability of one. The higher the expense, the higher the virtue. For instance, acne products are a huge product I consume and I tend to favor the women’s hence having a sensitive skin and a female influence on myself. If gendered marketing were to cease to exist, a selected few would feel a drastic change to consumerism. Myself, and possibly others, buy products based on their effectiveness and not on their gender-aimed audience. I would not mind for such a change, because after all, it never did hold a significance over my head.

  15. Responding to prompt number two, I do feel like I buy more products marketed towards males. Let me preface this by saying I do despise the idea of gender based marketing, and feel like it perpetuates divides in our society among genders. As long as the product works, I use it. But the reason I tend to pick up more male related products is mostly due to my mother. She is somewhat progressive, in terms of LGBTQ rights and being pro choice, etc, but being raised in the 60s has still made her have some opinions about gender roles. While she believes men and women are equal in society and need to be treated as such, some things are inherently masculine and others inherently feminine. And since she tends to pay for more of these products, she makes me get male marketed products by either questioning my choice and calling me feminine, or mocking me. So I choose to simply avoid feeling bad, and end up choosing the steel gray product that oozes arctic steel, testosterone, and the solidified form of sex appeal, or as the commercials would have you believe. I agree with Jadalynn when she says “From the business standpoint, gendered packaging is a phenomenal idea”. And it is. You pander to the lowest common denominator, genitalia. But at the same time, to the tobacco industry, selling cigarettes are a phenomenal idea. To the Manhattan Project, creating a bomb that can wipe cities off of the face of the earth was a phenomenal idea. Certain people thinking things are good doesn’t exactly mean that the things ARE good. Gendered marketing may increase the money in the pockets of Dove, but it also increases the divide in our society.

  16. The short video entitled, “Gendered Marketing | The Checkout” discusses market segmentation. According to the video, market segmentation is dividing consumers up into smaller groups in order to sell more products. More specifically, the video focuses on gendered marketing, where gender is divided for the purpose of better sales. In response to Rocky’s 1st prompt, I tend to buy more female marketed products because, I have always been told it is the correct thing to do. Ever since I was young I had always been given girl marketed toys, and assumed boy marketed toys were off limits due to my gender. Althea had a similar experience as a child stating, “There was nothing wrong with owning the feminized version of the product but I was denied the option of having a tool set, to build a Bionicle, or wanting the blue version of a Nintendo just because it was marked for boys”.

    Although I do admit I am a sucker for cute “feminine” packaging, it does not mean I am opposed to non-feminine packaging. If a company is marketing the same product but for different genders I think it is completely unnecessary because, the products should work the same. Furthermore, in some cases certain products can be more costly for the other gender which is unfair considering the products are essentially the same. For these reasons, I would not mind of gendered marketing where to disappear.

  17. I am answering Prompt #3.

    I do not buy my own product because I do not use a lot. But one thing is that I do not only use products meant for women. Even though I was only given stuff directed for women. I use anything that I find useful for me. I even use my little brothers’ shampoo. The ones that I do are like for women or at least what we need like pads.

    If I had a choice in what kind of products I get to use. I would buy the one that I am most interested in by their smell. I do not look into the stuff a lot. I am more concentrated in the price. Just because it says it is for women or for men, it does not change my mind. If I want it, then I should be able to get it. Also I could careless on how it looks, the whole point of the product is that it should work.

    I would not mind if the companies actually stopped advertising their products by gender. Like Chris Quintana said, “I don’t care if my Kiehl’s, Creme de Corps body lotion is marketed for women, it gets the job done.” People should not be to uptight about this kind of stuff because the things that they are looking for is probably in the section for “men.”

    So properly answering the prompt. I mostly buy gender neutral products (the cheapest I find) for my own practical preference. No, gender marketing makes me just buy products just for women. I honestly do not care about the packaging. Last, but not least. I would not mind if it discontinues. It will be easier to choose since you do not have to go to separate aisles to find something you like.

  18. In response to prompt number one I have began to notice, especially with the holiday season, the packaging of certain products are tailored to attract a specific gender. For example, in the case of buying shampoos some people may believe that the flowery pink packaging is meant to only be purchased by a female customer. I personally find this belief to be unfair and it should not matter what color a package is a person should find it socially acceptable to purchase any item they wish.I agree with Noah L when he states that gender marketing is “increasing the divide in our society”. However, I have noticed that generations are becoming more and more accepting and continue to change the beliefs that society holds. Therefore when reading previous comments I do believe that I, along with my peers, would not mind if gender marketing were to disappear.

  19. Prompt 1:

    I have never been the type of person to care whether or not the products I purchase are specifically meant for women or men. When I was little I dressed in boys clothes, played with Barbies and Hot Wheels, and had no regard for the types of products I owned and whether or not they were meant for boys or for girls. Even in my life now I still continue to purchase certain male products over female products because to me there should be no stigma of it being “wrong”. If I like the product then I will buy it regardless if it is a men’s product or a women’s product because to me if it is the same product or I like the item there is no need to separate genders. I would say most of the products I buy such as shampoo, soap, deodorant, and razors are all the feminine marketed products but I don’t solely purchase them because they’re pink or because of the packaging it is for other reasons. In my opinion the feminine packaged products while they may be designed to be aesthetically pleasing and aimed at making me buy them, it in no way makes me feel inclined to buy it, in fact sometimes the feminine packaging of certain products makes me not want to buy a certain product. It is incredibly unnecessary and unfair for everyone who is buying gender packaged products because it is essentially the same product just with different packaging. Also the fact that the same product could be cheaper for men but more expensive for women or vice versa is another reason why gender marketed products is unnecessary. I personally would not mind if gender packaging were to disappear because there really is no need for it, at the end of the day it’s all the same and you should be able to use and buy whatever you want. Collin said it best when he wrote, “Realistically, if gendered packaging were to disappear, very few would miss it.”

  20. Prompt 2:

    Growing up with three brothers, my toys were usually toys that were packaged for boys, but when it came to smaller things such as toiletries, it did not matter the gender packaging. I have always had curly hair, and throughout the years I have found that hair products intended for women work better for me. I do not purchase something based on if the color is masculine enough, I base my purchase off of whether I like it or not.

    Benjamin said, “I believe gendered packaging is not necessary because it is unfair for the people.” I agree with him because in society today children are being judged if the toy they are playing with corresponds to their gender, but it should not even matter if the child is happy. In the video, it is mentioned that, the company Bic made a pen for women. Personally I think this pen is pointless, it seems like the company is saying that women have been using the wrong pen their whole lives. Not having gendered packaging will also decrease the prices of certain items that have been priced more for one gender, even though the products only have few differences.

  21. Prompt 3

    Honestly I could care less about the packaging of product that I buy. If something works and works well then who cares if it’s not a “boy” product. I think Isaac couldn’t have put it better when he said “Personally, I would not go out of my way to specifically look for the “FOR MEN”

    After watching the video “Gender Marketing” I got up and checked to see what product of dove hair wash I use and I had the “girl” dove hair wash. I don’t purchase my products because of there their aesthetic color choices. If i like the way something smells or have heard good things about a product then i’ll purchase it. Personally gender marketing doesn’t persuade me to buy anything. Almost all my products are gender neutral.

    In conclusion If gendered packaging disappeared I would not mind. I don’t think it’s necessary for companies to do the gender packaging. I don’t think a product should be judged for its aesthetics but for how it works. Most of these products are super similar.

  22. Prompt #1
    I was the little girl growing up who loved everything pink and pretty. I played with dolls, princess play sets, and I remember only wanting to paint my nails a light pink. Of course, being so young I was not aware of the gender marketing that attracted me to my dolls and play sets in the first place. It’s shocking to me how accepting we are, as a society, of gender marketing; it’s used right in front of our eyes everywhere, and most of us simply accept gender marketing without questioning it.

    The video makes the point that it has become notorious in recent years for slyly digging into people’s pockets. Gender marketing has become a way for companies to charge one gender more for the same product, and most people are oblivious to the fact.

    Althea stated in her blog post, “People feel more inclined to buy a product if it is meant for them and companies use this fact to their advantage.” Personally, when I buy my vitamins “for women” it makes me feel like the product will be more beneficial to me more than a regular jar of vitamins would be. However, I recognize that there might not actually be an additional benefit from buying vitamins “for women”, as it is very likely to be a gender marketing scam. I probably would not mind if it were to disappear, but I think that it is very unlikely, considering that the approach has been very successful in generating additional revenue for large companies.

  23. What matters most when I’m buying a bottle of face wash is price and effectiveness. This goes to all the products I buy, deodorant, shampoo, razors, as long as it gets the job done, I’m happy. Colors and labeling don’t bother me at all and it can’t stop me from buying a product. As Isaac put it,” It’s sad to think that people feel the need to buy a certain product because “it’s made for them” when in reality you should be buying things because you like the way it smells, looks, or feels.” Buying things based on the packaging is flawed thinking.

    I couldn’t care less if gendered marketing disappeared, I see no harm in leaving or removing it. Kenneth said, “If gendered marketing were to cease to exist, a selected few would feel a drastic change to consumerism.” I agree it will cause a very small difference, people will use whatever they think fits them personally.

  24. Prompt #3
    At my house there would be a doll house right next to a box of Nerf guns and I would not even think twice about it. While I admit that I was given gender specific items at a younger age because of my parents being influenced by the large force known as market segmentation. Of course, this did not stop myself from playing with Barbie’s and Bionicles. Living in a house that does not mind having a blend of products for anyone to use has made me not care for any form of gender packaging. This does not mean that I always follow this philosophy though. If the video I watched made me realize something new, it is that I unconsciously restrict myself to the confines of the women aisles. I have never actually processed and acted upon Jaydalynn’s idea on products: “no one is actually forcing you to buy one product over the other, it is just personal preference. If you are a female, no one is stopping you from buying a male product or a gender neutral product, and vice versa.” My “personal” preference for products has been embedded in me ever since my mom introduced me to the feminine aisle. Thankfully, my visits to the feminine department has not made myself prone to buying women’s only products. This split modern market of having separate computers and pens for him and her just seems idiotic. A pen is a pen no matter what gender uses it. If the sales tactic of gender packaging were to disappear, then no one would really care. Afterall, it was the corporations, not the people, that wanted to enforce the idea for their own gain.

  25. Prompt #1
    I feel as though the affiliation with masculine and feminine products is just another form of social conformity, it’s become normal. Being denied the right to appreciate that, due to concerns with segregation within products, would be inhumane. Growing up, children are presented with their toys being separated by one thing, their gender. While we see it on the daily, such as going to the store, many products are separated based on each gender and extenuated by a color. For example, if a woman needs feminine napkins or any other feminine product, she will involuntarily know where her products would be located just by the color of the section.

    Notably, the effects of these gender products do serve as a method for either gender to correlate their characteristics with the things they use or buy. Men, as testosterone, infused human beings, do need certain products for their use and color coding them is not a negative thing but it’s become more of a prideful choice than a needed one. Women, being, at times, and emotional and irrational human being, often would feel comforted by the idea that their products can associate with them with a feeling of comfort and grace making the product much more admirable. All of these reasonings formed from being raised in that light. As Alejandra said,” My parents would always dress me in pink or light pastel colors because that’s what society would tell them and myself to do.”, the buying of these products emphasizing a gender has become so necessary that often times it seems wrong to not conform to what others are doing. This leads to a multitude of advertisements that associate with the comfort of gender-specific products to receive a profit.

    Although, these gendered products may get a bit exaggerated, at the bare minimum men and women do not contain the same body anatomy, thus separating products with colors and characteristics wouldn’t be too different compared to their bodies. They are different in themselves and separating them only confirms that. As I currently stand, I buy feminine products with the intent of getting what I need, but I definitely buy products that contain a feminine characteristic to it. It’s the effect of the product that gets me to buy it and by adding a nice feature to it would only enhance my want to buy it. If these products were to automatically become gender neutral, I don’t feel it would cause much of difference but it definitely has an elastic effect for being there.

  26. The fact that blue and pink have a connotation of gender is an interesting conversation in itself, though blue is the likely choice for a male I prefer the color pink because it gives me a sense of nostalgia. But often I avoid the products that are blatantly feminine, for example it would be unlikely for me to purchase feminine perfume or any other similarly scented products. This is damaging to a man’s reputation and though people argue that they don’t care about their reputations it is so obvious that it does. This applies to myself in terms of my inclination to purchase a product.

    Gendered packaging is necessary as a marketing stunt to attract a certain crowd to a certain product. It is fair in terms of product quality and pricing, but if it is the same quality with different colored packaging at different prices it is definitely uncalled for. I would not mind if it disappeared in fact I believe only my subconscious mind pays any attention to the packaging, it may be more difficult to distinguish products that I’ve preferred in the past.

  27. Prompt 3

    From a very young age, I tended to favor more minimalist and understated items. Rather than seeking flamboyant or bright colors, I sought more quiet tones. Of course, some of my family members thought it was unnatural. A girl was supposed to like all things pink and feminine just as boys needed to like all things blue and masculine. Despite their criticism, I kept to my own tastes and preferences in products. Even today, I shop for gender neutral products simply because I buy products for practicality. Gendered marketing doesn’t persuade me to buy one product over another, especially if I see that the only thing that differences the two is the packaging.

    My indifference toward product packaging does not mean that I do not care for the subject however. Rocky mentions that, “…the market is unnecessarily divided… Why do we need two versions of the same product?” I too ask myself the same question. I firmly believe that gendered marketing only adds to the preexisting gender issues found in society today. The fact that companies feel the need to package differently makes me upset because I feel that it’s as if they are agreeing with the idea that women and men are not equals. It makes me even more upset when these products are made feminine or masculine for kids. If children begin seeing those differences from a young age, they too begin to believe that they are different and thus cannot accomplish the same goals or have certain ambitions. If gendered marketing were to disappear, I would be one of the first to celebrate.

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