Blog Post #11

Hello, North House! It’s another beautiful southern California day, which means only mild sunburns and cursing the sky gods.

In light of the upcoming election (or election that already occured- shout out to the procrastinators)  I figured I’d make this blog assignment on the Generation Gap- Why we believe what we believe, why our parents believe what they believe, and why it’s such a big difference.

So, watch the video (link provided below the prompt) and answer what you feel is right. Happy writing!

Prompt: How do your opinions on politics and society differ from your parents? How are your opinions the same? Regarding the opinions that are different, where did they come from? (For example social media, learning from friends, et cetera).

 

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31 thoughts on “Blog Post #11

  1. According to the short animation, “Why Are Generations So Different?,” it explains why the opinions of parents and their children differ. I believe it is due to the influence of society, or the environment, upon an individual.

    In the video, the narrator illustrates the different generations and how they came about. For instance, the narrator mentions of the “Silent Generation” which resulted in the years of the Great Depression. Since this generation was bred into an environment of poverty and suffering, the people were very eager to attempt anything to promote wealth and success. In comparison to “Generation Z,” this group was bred into an era where “technology is defining to everything.” From computers to cell phones, or Facebook to Twitter, through the access of technology, people were – and continue to be – influenced.

    As a child, I was raised according to the morals of my faith. Therefore, most of my opinions on society, politics, etc., are in accord with my parents’ opinions. But, as a member of “Generation Z,” I am exposed to the vast scope of technology, where I am able to read important articles or simply listen to the news. Thus, I form my own perceptions upon the subject(s). Though there are circumstances where I presume I am correct, I discuss the issue with my parents and acquire an understanding of my decision. Although it may not make sense, I know it is for the “greater good.”

    To address Noah’s comment on the Generation Gap, there is a great difference between the beliefs of a parent and his/her child because of the dissimilar environments in which they were raised. Perhaps the parent was raised during the Vietnam War, whereas the child was raised during the rise of technology. On that account, their opinions on an impending war would differ. Like an author once mentioned, “If only we had similar minds, then we would understand each other.”

  2. Politics is something I was taught never to bring up at a dinner party, likely because like many things, it can either bring people together or tear them apart. In “Why Are Generations So Different?” the video shines a light about the different generations in the past one-hundred and fifty years and the general political views of each of them.

    Every individual is entitled to their political beliefs and I do agree with the video when it touches upon the point of how the generation which one is born in, shapes their paradigm of society. However, I also think one’s personal socioeconomic status, ethnic group, and geographical location plays a vital role in the way they look at society and politics.

    Like many, I’m a millennial. I am a product of the late 1990’s and am still currently developing my political stance in American society. My parents, on the other hand, are a product of the late 1960’s under “Generation X.” However, I can see where my political views not only clash with my parents and family but our whole social circle altogether. Growing up I very much lived in a bubble; I never understood the struggles many people face daily, and I generally took everything I was told as fact. For the most part, I was surrounded not only by conservative whites but also conservative Asians and Hispanics many of which are college educated or have built successful businesses from the ground up. I will never forget when I was about fourteen-years-old at a family member’s birthday party and several conservative, middle-aged, white men, from Newport Beach made their wives exit a conversation because they were women. This was my life – I was always surrounded by people who believed all abortion is wrong, that homosexuals shouldn’t have the right to marry, and that a woman’s role is at home taking care of the children.

    Surrounded by conservatives my whole life and then attending I-Poly was a complete culture shock. The only democrat I knew was my grandfather who was a product of the Great Depression and very much believed in the plans President Roosevelt put into play under the New Deal. I soon realized that there was much more to what I was taught at my small, private, Christian school and what I would overhear the adults talking about at parties. I-Poly has given me the opportunity to develop my sense as a person, to be more open-minded, and to see the world through a different lens. I am much more liberal than most the people I know outside of I-Poly and I think that is okay. I wouldn’t necessarily register as a democrat when I turn eighteen, but I wouldn’t register as a republican either. My experience in these two different worlds has given me the opportunity to see both sides of an issue and determine my stance in a more logical fashion that isn’t defined by party lines.

    I am much more of an independent than anything else, and I think that is okay. I am liberal but not too liberal. I am conservative but not too conservative. I am someone who just wants positive change to progress our society in a positive direction. I have mastered and believe in setting aside personal beliefs and morals to uphold one’s constitutional rights as Americans. I am not a party loyalist like many of the people I know, nor do I think I will ever be.

  3. While we may often think of our parent’s and relative’s political views as drastically distorted relative to our own, in reality they’re not so far apart. You see, when we were children we were constantly exposed to our parent’s political views. Be that directly, such as a home where a liberal father explicitly instructed the dangers of capitalism to his children. Or less subtly; perhaps hearing your parent’s take on Ronald Reagan from the living room while watching cartoons. Or even in Chris Q’s case when he recounts how “conservative, middle-aged, white men, from Newport Beach made their wives exit a conversation because they were women”. These views, whether we like to admit it or not, manifest themselves in to who we are. After all, its not up until the point of late adolescence where we are really exposed to different ideas, cultures and political spectrum. As a result, the same ideas your parent’s had about, say welfare, will likely be the same opinions you hold in the future- for the most part. Its the reason why most children will retain the same political party affiliation their parents had. Because, what seems correct all stems from childhood as is what is familiar.

    As someone who spends at least thirty hours a week actively working in politics with local, state and federal politicians, I can speak from experience. Especially when it comes to party affiliations. Once you enter the world of competitive politics, it is all about the party image. Politicians always want to be endorsed by the Democratic or Republican clubs, parties, etc, because they know how much weight the name holds. One of my candidates explained it to me the best, she said “A man might know nothing about the candidates, but I guarantee he knows two things: Democrats and Republicans.” And once you hold a clear grasp on a political nomination, the constituency usually follows- usually.

    But I digress. In my personal situation I can’t say I’m much different from my parents. I hold much of the same opinions about immigration, welfare, gay marriage and unlike other people was never discouraged from participating in political discussions. Although, that probably wasn’t because my parents believed in me, but rather because they probably knew as little about government as I did as a child. Like I mentioned before the conversations I heard from my parents, shaped my opinions today.

    And even though I slowly see myself accepting some ideas of other ideologies and retreating from my parents, that doesn’t mean I’ll switch parties. Actually, even if I wanted to I don’t think my jobs would let me. For now, I will stay true to the color of my party in hopes I will be able to return the favor some day in the future.

  4. The video, “Why Are Generations So Different” attempts to pinpoint the reasons why our opinions differ from our parents, such as being born during a certain time period, growing up while different events are taking place like wars and civil rights movements, and having an adult perspective on various and contemporary issues.

    Both of my parents are from the generation known as the “Baby Boomers” or people born from Post World War II to 1964. The video assumes that the parents of the people watching this video are American, but they aren’t. They are immigrants from the Philippines, so they have different cultural experiences as “Baby Boomers.” They weren’t really influenced by the rock and roll music, or the hippie wave that occurred through America. But I do believe that growing up in different generations and environments has influenced why I am so different from my parents in opinions of social issues and politics.

    My parents both grew up in very religious and conservative homes in the Philippines. They both went to Catholic schools their whole lives and had strict households. However I was raised very different. First off I was born here in America. I came out embracing that American privilege. Second, my parents grew out of the routine of the religion they were raised with once they got to America, but still held onto some of their conservative views. But my parents most strongly held onto the stereotypes and political views they had grown up with in the Philippines.

    My opinions on politics and society differ from my parents in many areas. I value the rights of an American more than they do. For example, my parents are supportive of the current President of the Philippines in his war on drugs where he’s basically killing people on sight if they are caught with possessing drugs. Although this is not a situation in America, I still think every person should have a right to trial before they are categorized as guilty and definitely before they are sentenced to death. This is an issue where I stand on the other side of the line with my parents. However an area where we share mostly the same opinion is religion. My parents didn’t raise me in a religious household, but they’ve always taught me to do what was right. Over the years, I’ve seen what they’ve taught me overlap our beliefs in religion and I can say that we stand on the same side of the line in many aspects there.

    I think my differing opinion on political issues came from the fact that we were born in a time of different social issues arising and raised in totally different countries. I agree with Chris Q. “I also think one’s personal socioeconomic status, ethnic group, and geographical location plays a vital role in the way they look at society and politics.” My father grew up wealthy and had the opportunity to live in different place because his dad was in the U.S. Navy. My mother grew up on the poorer side and didn’t know anywhere else except for the Philippines. Because of their sacrifices I was fortunate enough to grow up in America reap the benefits and privileges in being raised as a middle class family. I have gotten more opportunities at my fingertips than my parents had when they were growing up and this has greatly influenced my opinion making on politics and social issues.

  5. In the book, “Generations” created by William Strauss and Neil Howe, are theories as to why we have differences among all generations. In the video, “Why are Generations so Different?” the narrator attempts to breakdown the different sets of generations along with the reasons why they think and believe in the things they do. In the video, the narrator describes how each generation has their own three main factors: an awakening, a crisis, and a culture war. Each of those factors play a significant role in their views. It is a given that every generation has had their own specific events and beliefs during their time and all events will continue to vary as the years go by.

    My opinions regarding politics are still in flux as I still do not know where I stand completely. In my family, politics are not as big of a deal as it should be in comparison to others. I think my family and I can agree that we all just want someone who will not completely ruin the country. Romel M. stated that, “While we may often think of our parent’s and relative’s political views as drastically distorted relative to our own, in reality they’re not so far apart. You see, when we were children we were constantly exposed to our parent’s political views.” While this is true, we would not have formed any of our own independent views if we had nothing else to compare it with, but in most cases we tend to adapt and grow with the ideas we are surrounded with.

    In terms of society and social issues, I do know that we all want what is beneficial for everyone. Every situation is different, so opinions do diversify. Things such as, immigration, abortion, gun laws, taxes, gay rights, etc are where our similar views somewhat drift. As Chris Q. put it, “Every individual is entitled to their political beliefs and I do agree with the video when it touches upon the point of how the generation which one is born in, shapes their paradigm of society.” Just like Chris, I do agree with that same idea because as a society we may all have similar views, but it all comes down as to what we, as an individual believe. Like the video explains, conservative and religious views are not as prevalent as it was several generations ago. Some would argue that people are “stuck in the past” and need to catch up with the current times. For example, one of the biggest influencers of today’s generation is social media as this current age highly depends on technology. These different opinions come from those three factors mentioned earlier. Ideas and viewpoints are always changing and will continue to change no matter what because ideas will forever clash.

  6. The political and societal views of my parents are fairly closed minded, though they are aware of politics and society they are unable to interpret it completely. Beautifully said by Romel “..what seems correct all stems from childhood as is what is familiar.” My parents are smart people who are capable of having more enlightened views on the world, but due to the way they were raised they have trouble straying far from what they were taught. I differ from them because they raised me without nailing their perspectives onto me, though they provided suggestions I was simultaneously exploring the web for my ideals. After several years of internet consumption you pick up a few things, ranging from cat videos to theories of infinite universes. I do not blindly take everything I come upon as fact, but merely as a proposition of which I can personally interpret and decipher. I believe our generation, the internet generation is the most sophisticated of all generations. We are connected to vast amounts of information and vast amounts of people to collaborate with, here we can find our ideals, here we can find ourselves. My parents only had access to word of mouth and libraries, which they likely did not take full advantage of until later in their lives. I have similar opinions with my parents in terms of the desire for money and success, but this is a foundation that is necessary for all human beings to carry. Our capabilities are hand in hand with the amount of cash we hold.

  7. In the video “Why Are Generations so Different?” it gives a description of the different generations that have come to be since World War I to present day. It really gives people a better understanding as to how different generations might have become so differently raised and come to having different views. After watching this video, I could see how my parent’s views and mine are so different. They stand by a certain thing and they want me to follow them. They also base their opinions strongly on faith. For me on the other hand, I don’t let faith control how I see the world. For example, my opinions on the LGBT community are far different from my parents. I respect the choices some people make based on their sexual orientation but for my parents, they believe it is a sin against God. In some way our opinions are the same like our views on global warming and politics. I believe the difference between my generation and my parents is that my generation is more open and susceptible to change and can adapt to it as to my parents, they feel that nothing should change and that they should have things the way the are used to having them. They really didn’t have internet the way we do now and social media seemed to be pushed down my generations throat more than it is to my parents. I agree with Chanel when she said that most of the different views we obtain from our parents is due to the fact we are born in a different time. Things may be different from when they we our age. People can either just adapt to the views of that time period or but stuck in the past and let the past control ones life.

  8. The video above talks about the differences of ideas we say or choose between parents and children. It is probably because of the environment we live in and the different types of social media that influences us.

    My opinions on both society and politics can differ, but sometimes go along with what my parents have to say. In terms of the recent election, my parents saw Donald Trump as a crazy, inappropriate man and because of that, it is that reason why they do not want to vote for him. I am not saying that I do support him, but you also have to look at the ideas he is planning to do and how you should not dismiss him because of things he has said and done (i do not support trump). As for Hilary, even though she committed a crime (the emails) my parents would vote for her because she is not crazy like Trump. This would be something where my parents and myself would not see eye-to-eye because they would focus more on their personalities and dismiss their ideas and plans. Along with this, my opinions differ because there are teachers who teach us about the two candidates on what they propose and believe in. Social media also has that ability to manipulate the candidates and put on influence on what people think of the two. You see this mostly on Facebook and Twitter; Facebook which is an application that most parents use and Twitter is an application that most teens/ young adults use which leads to my reason how social media can affect our opinion. As Jaydalynn B. said, “Some would argue that people are “stuck in the past” and need to catch up with the current times.” and that is true because there are people who are stuck in the pass and ignores the facts that are happening in the present.

    As for society, this is a topic where we do see eye-to-eye because we do see the disasters, mistreatment, and chaos that is all over the news and social media platforms. It does hurt a lot to see many people get caught into those type of situations when did not deserve it in the first place. Society has changed so much these past decades that there are both parents and children who do not respect one’s music, ideas, and change.

    Lastly, everyone has different ideas, opinions, and sees the world differently. In terms of religion, God gave us the ability of free will where we have the ability to do and not to do in our lives. No one is forcing us to follow and believe in the same thing, and if that was the case what would be the point of having options or the ability to say or do what we want. The choices you make should not be shot down by other people or taken into consideration. People can do the craziest things, but in the end they chose that path and maybe it made them happy, maybe it did not. Your opinions and choices matter more than the people who criticize you or does not believe in your opinion because.

  9. Coming from an interracial family, the views from both parents are direct counterparts, that is, both sides of my family are heavily contradicted with one another. For instance, my paternal side of the family are die-hard conservatives while contrasting with my maternal’s moderate liberal stance. As Benjamin T. had nicely stated, “I believe it is due to the influence of society, or the environment, upon an individual,” I do too believe the views of one are descended to the way they are raised.
    I have always been brought up in a highly conservative manner such as upholding traditional family traditions. As such, religion did play a vital role in my life as my views of society slowly developed. Like seen with the rise of the LGBTQ community, I was quick to judge the ones who I perceived as intolerable and “sub-human.” In all honesty, I was terrified of what was occurring in the nation as circumstances such as two men holding hands in public. All the values and customs I was taught to serve were now being differed as time was moving too rapidly to comprehend the situation. Anyhow, as years passed, my ideologies and influences have now changed for the better; from being a god-fearing homophobic to a more moderate individual. As my mother had once told me that changed my views on homosexuality, “Telling someone to not marry a certain person is like telling someone to not eat junk food because you’re on a diet.” Yet, I do believe it is a tad unusual to see two men caressing one another because of how I lived and grew but there is one verse from the Bible that constantly keeps me in check from judgment, “Judge not, that you be not judged. For with the judgment you pronounce you will be judged, and with the measure you use it will be measured to you”(Matthew 7:1-2 ).
    I still consider myself a conservative but a moderate on certain issues such as abortions and same-sex marriage to this day. As time goes on, ideologies do change. Relating back to Benjamin’s comment, our beliefs do play a part of how we were raised. After all, it has made on who we are to this day and age. It is perfectly fine to differ from your parents’ or families’ viewpoints because they define on who and what kind of individual you are. If there are two very distinct aspects of both families, it creates a blend or combination of opinions that works well perfectly. Like Chris Q. had written, “My experience in these two different worlds has given me the opportunity to see both sides of an issue and determine my stance in a more logical fashion that isn’t defined by party lines,” there is no set definition of a person. That is what makes individualism the best ideology in the world. You do not have to be a copy of someone and you could be whoever you wish to be, even if it means not being anyone.

  10. My parents have never been passionate and interested about politics same way I am. When we finally had the chance to talk about the election results, their reactions were as I expected – meh. Unlike many of my peers and their families, mine had no problem accepting that Donald Trump was the president elect. While they don’t like Trump, they support the principles he’s backing. Traditional marriage and ban on abortion all tie in with the conservative religious values that they were raised with. Unlike my parents however, my stands on these issues are very different. This change in opinion is what the video “Why Are Generations So Different” attempts to explain.

    These “turnings” as the video labels them explain “a pattern of events within a generation” that set us apart from our predeceasing generation. Like Chanel’s parents, mine too immigrated to this country. They were able to smoothly transition into this culture one, because they were young and two, their conservative background agreed with Generation X at the time. Growing up with in a conservative bubble similar to Chris, I adopted their beliefs without question for a long time. I did not agree with homosexuality or abortion, because it was clearly a sin. I was very weary of those who were part of other religions, because mine taught they were pagan and should stay away from them. For me this provided a lot of challenges when I entered middle school. Everyone I hung out with had different stances on different issues. Some were for gay marriage, some were political junkies, others were Muslim. Instead of being afraid of them I was interested in them. I liked to call them my friends, because they got new ideas running through my head and vise versa. This was how my stance on political and social issues began to differ from my parents.

    I agree with Chris when he says “attending I-Poly was a complete culture shock.” Here was where I got to me a lot of very open people willing to accept new ideas. This aligned with the videos comment that Millennials created a culture shift of liberalism. I began to amend the values and beliefs that I had carried for so long. I wasn’t trying to abandon my faith like others, but rather still having that be a big part of me while accommodating how I felt about same – sex marriage and the right women should have to do what they want with their bodies. While I wouldn’t consider myself a liberal extremist it would be a lie to say that I am a conservative like my parents.

    I see my generation as very anxious and impatient as well as extremely involved in their future. I sometimes wonder if being too liberal too fast is a bad idea.

  11. My parents and I have always disagreed on politics and society. They have always been very religious people so they believe abortion is a sin as well as being gay/ lesbian/ bisexual/ transsexual/ etc. In those subjects, we clash a lot and have many heated arguments because I am in a generation where it is completely normal and I 100% support the lgbt community and think abortion is completely fine. My opinions came from a lot of different places like social media, friends, family members (not my parents), and IPoly. I could see that the people from the lgbt community are completely normal just like me. I also think that a woman should do whatever they want with their body and should not be judged by it. My parents and I do agree on some things like Trump being the craziest and dumbest person alive. We are a Mexican family who loves our background and him winning presidency affected us a lot so we did agree and have similar emotions and beliefs during this election.
    In the video, it talks about how we have a generation gap between our parents and ourselves. I agree with a lot of what the video states because I think that our parents did live in a different time and different things were going on so they do not understand a lot of what we believe in. In the past, people were so used to seeing a man and woman together and when people started coming out saying a man and a man could be together as well as a woman and a woman, they didn’t think it was normal. At this day and age, we see it everywhere and we see that it is okay and that there some people out there who support and we think it is completely normal, where as our parents generation and older generations see it as crazy and unbelievable.
    I agree with Josh when he says, “… everyone has different ideas, opinions, and sees the world differently. In terms of religion, God gave us the ability of free will where we have the ability to do and not to do in our lives. No one is forcing us to follow and believe in the same thing, and if that was the case what would be the point of having options or the ability to say or do what we want.” I don’t judge other people’s opinions and I don’t think it is okay for others to judge mine. I believe in what I believe in and as long as I am not hurting people or offending people in the process, I think it is okay.

  12. In the video it demonstrates the gaps that occur between generations. My views on society and politics don’t differ much from my parents. I believe that the only reason my views are but different is because I was raised in California surrounded by a very diverse population, while my mom was raised in Mexico with a not so diverse population. I believe this diverse population has allowed me to experience different cultures and be open to different ideas.
    The majority of my opinions are similar to my mom’s; we both believe in the rights of all people no matter their backgrounds, race, or religion. I believe that the little differences that we do have come from as the video mentioned the generation gap. Since I am surrounded by all these different social medias, I am exposed to more opinions from other people and am also greatly influenced. My mom, however, not being exposed to all this media and other people’s opinions, I feel that she is less open minded than I am.

  13. My opinions on politics and society do not differ from that of my mom. She’s always been the one to teach me and still to this day what she believes in and says makes sense to me. For the most part the friends I have around also seem to take on after their parents and their beliefs. My mother has always had a more liberal look on things. Always willing to and open to new ideas and teaching me to be the same way. She made sure I went to private school and learned about religion but it was never a hardcore belief in our family. She is extremely accepting and that has come down onto me and so I do not judge others on what they want to do as long as they are happy that is all that matters. I cannot give an example of us having any different opinions on something because we have yet to disagree. The video pointed out that the views of the many are shaped by what is going on at the time which is entirely true. Most people probably have different opinions from their parents and it may have to do with the experiences they have in life not necessarily on the parent rising them that way. In which case Christopher’s point that “Every individual is entitled to their political beliefs.” Which is entirely tre people can grow out of what they believe in at the time.

  14. I agree with what Jaydalynn said, “of those factors play a significant role in their views. It is a given that every generation has had their own specific events and beliefs during their time and all events will continue to vary as the years go by.” because like I said previously the gender gap greatly influence our opinions.

  15. The video talks about how there is a generation gap between ourselves and our parents. This is something that I believe in because my parents and I do not see eye to eye in some situations. As Alejandra says “our parents did live in a different time.” This is a statement that I agree with because my parents have trouble accepting the lgbt community. This was a issue that was not talked about during their time but in this generation, the lgbt community is a heated topic. Most people in my age accept the lgbt community but for people it may be hard to accept.
    This is not always the case because my parents and I share some views because we have the same culture. When it comes to political views or even day by day topics, we share the same idea. How I was raised is another factor why parents and kids can share the same points of view. For example, my parents and I both go for the U.S and Mexico national soccer team. When both play each other, both of us cheer for the U.S even though my parents were born in Mexico and I am Mexican- American. The reason why my parents cheer for the U.S is because they found a better life in the United States. I cheer for the U.S because the U.S is where I was born, where I got my education, and where I will live a good life. For the most part, everybody thinks differently. We all have our opinions, ideas, and people may or may not agree with them.

  16. In the video it demonstrates the gaps that occur between generations. My views on society and politics don’t differ much from my parents. I believe that the only reason my views are but different is because I was raised in California surrounded by a very diverse population, while my mom was raised in Mexico with a not so diverse population. I believe this diverse population has allowed me to experience different cultures and be open to different ideas.
    The majority of my opinions are similar to my mom’s; we both believe in the rights of all people no matter their backgrounds, race, or religion. I believe that the little differences that we do have come from as the video mentioned the generation gap. Since I am surrounded by all these different social medias, I am exposed to more opinions from other people and am also greatly influenced. My mom, however, not being exposed to all this media and other people’s opinions, I feel that she is less open minded than I am.
    I agree with what Jaydalynn said, “Each of those factors play a significant role in their views. It is a given that every generation has had their own specific events and beliefs during their time and all events will continue to vary as the years go by.” because like I said previously the gender gap greatly influences one’s opinions.

  17. In the video “Why Generations are so Different” by “KnowledgeHub”, the creator explains the gap between generations and how that can lead to parents and children differing in many beliefs and opinions.

    Growing up it was very apparent that my parents could care less about politics and societal views. My mother was raised in a very strict Christian household with a large family. From what I have been told, my grandparents on my mom’s side were very passionate about politics and had strong opinions on societal issues. Due to her parent’s strong views on politics and society, she was raised to believe that issues such as abortion and gay rights were morally wrong. On the other hand, my dad really has no affiliation with his family so I am not sure how much he was influenced. However, my experience growing up was much less influential. My parents really did not want anything to do with their families so in turn they ignored the morals and societal standpoints they were taught all their life. My mother who was raised in a religious household attempts to remain religious, she does not agree with her parents views, and she has no interest whatsoever in politics. I was never forced by my parents to adopt their views growing up so in turn I was left to formulate my own opinions.

    In a way my opinions are different from that of my parents but since I was raised in a household where politics and societal issues were not super important, my parents really have no opinions on most things so therefore I cannot compare. For example I believe the only difference I have with my mom in opinions is on politics not being important. Over the years through school and social media, I have come to learn that politics is important and so is getting involved. In the end the opinions and standpoints of generations are all going to differ due to the age gap. Like Josh said in his post, “Everyone has different ideas, opinions, and sees the world differently,” which I agree with. It is important to recognize that everyone sees the world through their own eyes and the opinions of others are going to differ. As an individual you have the choice to believe in whatever you want to free of judgment or influence from others.

  18. My views on society and politics don’t differ that much from those of my parents. Many of my views I adopted from parents. One thing we don’t agree on is religion. I was raised Roman Catholic which is the faith of my parents. I was actually pretty religious from what I can remember when I was younger, but as I started learning more about the world my faith faded away. My parents and I have argued a lot because of this but I like to talk about it with them. I think I can have a good discussion with them where they support their beliefs and I mine. But we don’t always argue like I said most of my views I share with my parents. The respect I have for women was instilled on me at a very young age. My mother grew up without a father and my grandmother’s father also died when she was young. Throughout my whole life strong women that I have nothing but the utmost respect for have always surrounded me. I feel like even though there is a generation gap between my parents and I we agree on a lot. That is why my views on society and politics are so close to those of my parents.
    I agree with Isaac when he says that his mother has been to teach him. My mother also taught me much of how I should behave and what I should believe in. I think that is why much of my views on society and politics are accepting. My mother believes that people should be able to believe what they want as long as they aren’t hurting anyone.

  19. By using facts throughout history and debriefing each generation starting with the Lost generation and concluding with our generation the video, “Why are Generations so Different?” gives an explanation for the different views between intertwining eras.

    My parents are both from the Philippines and became citizens of the United States when I was nine. My dad has the most passion and attention for politics in my family. He believes that politics determines society while my mom does not care about it. In some ways I believe in my dad’s opinion. Politics determines this country’s economy, healthcare, immigration, etc. and it is our job as citizens to make sure our voices are heard. I think that I am lucky to be a part of a country that tries to offer freedom despite its setbacks.

    My stance on politics is determined by external influences and my morals. I have a lot of similar beliefs as my parents in regards to abortion, gun control, etc. In the past, my parents had very strong views regarding the LGBTQ community but as times change so has their opinions. Today, they believe that everyone has the right to be with who they want to be with and they should not be treated differently because of it. Regardless, I agree with Chris Q. statement, “I also think one’s personal socioeconomic status, ethnic group, and geographical location plays a vital role in the way they look at society and politics.” A large portion of my opinions coincide with my parents but the reason my dad holds his opinions is because of our ethnicity, socioeconomic status, and location. If I lived in a different location my views might be completely different as it is today. Remember, we are the mold of the five people we surround ourselves most with everyday.

  20. The video, “Why Are Generations So Different?” explains the gap between our generation and our parents’ generation, and why we do not always view things in the same way. In my belief, my opinions on society and politics do not differ all that much from that of my parents. Although my parents are from a different generation and spent the beginning of their lives in El Salvador, I believe that we have the same opinions because I grew up listening to them talk about their beliefs. My parents have raised my brothers and me to be very religious, which have influenced certain ways I view society.

    Each generation has had a factor that has influenced their views on politics and society, our generation just so happens to be social media. I agree with Jaydalynn when she said, “one of the biggest influencers of today’s generation is social media as this current age highly depends on technology” because society today is so dependent on technology that something on social media can easily influence a person’s point of view. If my parents and I disagree on something, it may be because I have been exposed to it in a different form which is social media.

  21. I live in a very optimistic household. The same kind of sweltering optimism that can be compared to a bright and sunny day that somehow breaks temperature records and causes multiple cases of heatstroke. I hate blind optimism. As someone firmly rooted in the philosophies of stoicism and existentialism, the best thing optimism can offer is the stupendous rejection of reality until one’s own physiology changes itself just to cater to the mind’s ignorant ideals. To me, hope is the worst demon of all, for it is the one that forces people to continue subjecting themselves to misery. Unlike my parents, I consider the worst and work on solutions. Due to the stark difference in me and my parents’ capacity to trust the nature of man, our political opinions are quite different as well. My parents tend to think kindly of people, and they are hardly skeptical of what they see or hear. I, however, have had a hard time keeping such naivety, and am much quicker to question the authority of others. As for where my bleak existentialism came from, all I can say is that I really don’t blame others for not feeling the same way. The important part is to keep an open mind to any and all possibilities, and to be honest with oneself. It takes a lot of courage to do so, but it is truly a liberating experience. I may seem bitter and pessimistic, but I am far from it. I have boldly faced reality, and I have accepted it.

  22. The animated video, “Why are generations so different,” shed some light on why these generations are different and what occurred during those times to cause it to be so different. Major technological advances occurred in the last century and with that came different outlooks on life which changed perspectives and what people thought was right or wrong. Technology is a big factor in why these generations have such big gaps because these new advances spurred controversial topics throughout the century such as nuclear weapons and electric chair execution or war weapons like lethal gases. Wheres in the 1800s and prior centuries the common people in society usually all lived similar lives in farming or factories expecting their kids to do the same thing and tended to have the same morals which never really changed society’s thinking. New technology has come to create new and different jobs that changed perspectives of what people can achieve, and when people realized that their life could be different and better with a new found american dream they realized that they could achieve great things. Then we came into the millennial era with more technology than ever. We realized that our parents and their generation went out and reached for their dreams and made a good life for us and now that we are living comfortably why would we have to go out and work hard when we have technology at our fingertips entertaining us letting us do whatever we want whenever we want. The biggest generation gap, of the ones mentioned in the video is between the baby boomers and the millennials, which for most of us is between us and our parents. Because of new technology and social media, it has caused us to divide and separate from other generations because of different perspectives on political and social issues and I agree with what Chris said, “Every individual is entitled to their political beliefs and I do agree with the video when it touches upon the point of how the generation which one is born in, shapes their paradigm of society.” Even though there is a large generational gap, we can still respect each other and hear what others have to say.
    In my household, technology hasn’t played that big of a role in dividing us except for the occasional assistance helping my parents with something on the computer or phone. I share the same strong Christian values as my parents so we don’t ever argue about politics because we agree, but also because I don’t really like politics because I’ve just never have been interested in it and I hate arguing with people about politics because the conversation never goes anywhere and nobody ever sees eye to eye. But that’s ok because that’s what makes us different and creative and inspired. The millennial generation may get a reputation for being slackers because of technology, but what many people don’t realize is that we have used technology to our advantage by expressing ourselves. Although technology has created a large gap between generations, I believe it has unified us as millennials.

  23. In the animation entitled, “Why Are Generations So Different” discusses the “Generational Gap” which is the difference between the generations.The narrator gathered a theory from the book entitled,“Generations”, written by William Strauss and Neil Howe. According to this theory, the generational gap is caused by the events that happened within the generation. These events are broken down into four categories: high, awakening, unraveling, and crisis. The narrator goes in depth about the theory by citing specific instances that have happened throughout the generations.

    My opinions regarding my political does not differ from that of my parents. Although I am not involved with politics I have a bit of an understanding on where I stand, which happens to coincide with my parents. My parents have never been keen about politics, so I would say that is one thing we have in common. Jaydalynn states, “I think my family and I can agree that we all just want someone who will not completely ruin the country”. This statement is relevant to my family an I because, we do not have a strong political presence, but we will stand behind what is best for the country.

    My views on society do not differ from that of my parents. Isaac states, “She is extremely accepting and that has come down onto me and so I do not judge others on what they want to do as long as they are happy that is all that matters”.My parents are similar to Isaac’s mom because they have taught me what they believe is right, which is to be accepting of others. I am grateful that my parents taught me the importance of acceptance.This is an essential quality to have especially in today’s society.

  24. My parents and what I think on certain topics are different by the way we think it should be solved or mentioned. For example, one time I saw a girl that looked like she was in elementary or middle school. My parents thought that it looked bad in a young child, they should have not done that, why did their parents let them, and how they feel about her. I saw it as nothing, not good or bad, but if she wants that for her hair. Then we should respect her decision. When I said that to my parents, their reactions were in a negative way. They said that a parent should not let their child do something like that at a young age. The way I replied was in a way that made them speechless. My response to that comment was, “It does not affect us in any way on how the little girl dyed their hair.” That was the end of the conversation. When the opinions of my parents and I usually are different. It will not be just a side talk, but we will go on and on until we have proven our points on why it is right. When our opinions are the same, we just keep on discussing on why we think it is the right thing and agree with each point we all say.

    I believe that my opinions come from how I was raised within my family, environment, my peers and the “time” I live in. I see things that seem fine to me, but other people will usually start discriminating it. The “other people” usually are older generation. If it was a person around my age, it would have been by the way they were raised and how it influenced greatly into their lives. Like Chris Quintana said, “Like many, I’m a millennial. I am a product of the late 1990’s and am still currently developing my political stance in American society.” I am still young and learning things from the world, so I am more exposed to the things that are being talked about these days. Also what Chris said, “My parents, on the other hand, are a product of the late 1960’s under ‘Generation X.” My parents were not exposed to some of the things as much as they are now. Which makes us think about certain topics very differently.

  25. In the video, the narrator explains the changing values and beliefs of the different generations overtime. What influences this are major events and evolving culture throughout the years. Society and the media have had huge influence over the people ever since the television first came out. Today technology is a tool for people to use to spread their ideas and opinions and people now have a chance to view or share conflicting viewpoints/beliefs that go against their own. Before people based their ideas and beliefs on people they know, now they can see the whole picture. It puts the world in a new perspective for some.

    Now, growing up, my family rarely talks about politics; it’s not a forbidden topic to discuss, but a subject my parents take no interest in. Although my parents’ political stances are unknown, relating to Jaydalynn, “…my family and I can agree that we all just want someone who will not completely ruin the country.” My parents are open-minded people; they don’t like choosing sides when it comes to politics. Currently I’m in the midst of determining where I stand, but for now I’m just a bystander.

  26. I live in an all Mexican home and my family have their opinions on politics but more so to what benefits the Latino people. My mom came from nothing and she doesn’t want her new life to be easily threatened by any policies against a certain group of people. As well as my mother, my father also hopes for the best for the Latino community. Being raised as a proud Chicano I understand their troubles and their political views for it is a topic that will commonly arise at dinner. My parents have both been here since the late 1970’s and early 1980’s so they have lived through discrimination and fear in this country.

    My parents and I see eye to eye on political views which is a good thing because it shows they raised me to be wise like them. With that being said there is really no difference in opinions among my family members. For instance, my family all agrees that we’re screwed for the next four years. We all understand and take note of each other’s political views, so we generally get along when we talk about politics. But, I also agree with Brian when says, “Many of my views I adopted from my parents.” This statement also relates to my parents and I.

  27. My parents and I hold very similar political views. In fact, my parents are the people who fostered the political views I hold starting from a very young age, as I imagine many other parents would have that effect on their children. The video mentions that the varying events and circumstances that a generation withstands is a determining factor of how that generation views policy and social taboos. When I asked my parents what that determining factor was for them, I did not anticipate the answer I received. My parents said that the reason they hold their political views is not because of one single event, or even a series of events that have happened in the political arena during their lifetime; instead, their political views are attributed to what they believe is right and just- in their opinion, however.

    To expand the discussion to an even older generation, my grandparents have also said that their political views are based on what they believe to be right and just. Interestingly enough, my grandparents and parents hold polar opposite political views. For example, my grandparents are very religious and conservative people, and believe that a marriage is only between a man and a woman. My parents and I, however, strongly disagree with this view, and would be considered more liberal than my grandparents for that reason.

    Considering this generational divide in political and social views, it would then be reasonable to determine what exactly the determining factor is that facilitates such opposing views. The answer at first could seem very clear cut, being that my grandparents are of an older generation with a traditional values; but another thing I pondered was the status of social taboos in the 1960s in comparison to now, in the year 2016. The LGBT movement had not yet gained its momentum in the 1960s, which is the determining factor that I would conclude has influenced my grandparents political and social opposition to gay marriages.

    I agree with Althea when she says “My stance on politics is determined by external influences and my morals.” The external influences I would attribute my stance on politics, other than my parents, would be social media and peer interaction.

  28. The differences between generations in the past, generations now, and generations in the furture is that they have all set their beliefs as they grew up and were given certain opportunities. Whether these generations were influenced by an opinion or decided to oppose opinions they have evolved their separate ways. In fact, learning from parents often teaches kids of the goods and bars of society , influencing their opinions , but as those kids grow older they are given bigger influences that is used to expand their knowledge and give them chances to change their opinions.

    In the video, called, “Why are generations so different”, it really explains the abilities of certain events and social conformity to affect the generations decisions. Nessecities were more relevant in one generation than the others and that has given a lasting affect to certain actions made. The reason why I feel there is a generation gap between my dad and I, and that there will be even with my baby brother, is that, as history has proven, technology becomes an important factor with new generations and the generations being able to implement those technological advancements are the groups that are fully able to use the advantages of their time and give them the chance to change their opinions from others based on their advantages.

    Although my father and I would have some similarities together in politics, at the moment, I am too premature to sway my vote any which way. Although in debates with my father we often give each other the diplomatic views on the subject of politics and form a consensus based on our political views. As Jesse D stated, “If my parents and I disagree on something, it may be because I have been exposed to it in a different form, which is social media.” These different forms of informations becomes what we have focused on in our generations and has become what outlasted each past generations as far as political views. Being exposed and used to seeing forms of technology, there is no reason not to believe those forms of information since we obtain the opportunity to view opinions in a multitude of ways, besides our parents intital view. As seen with past generations, as long as more technology and experiences become clear and available to new generations, it will press a generation gap as those new generations grow up with new methods and a multitude of new opinions.

  29. It’s only natural to rebel against parental authority- or any authority really. These are not the words most parents want to hear but to have it otherwise would be a disservice to the human species and ourselves. If children never rebelled against the ideas they grew up with, then all that would be coming out of this world is a conforming and stagnant future. A future without innovation and improvement is not one I intend to be a part of. I believe that life is all about questioning what we’re taught and creating change when it is required. I think that it’s one’s duty to out learn and outlive our ancestors. With the change and rebellion each generation brings, a clash between generations is born.

    My parents and I both grew in opposite times and places. This comes to explain our different ideas and values. While my parents grew up in poverty-stricken streets in Mexico, I grew up on the streets of Pasadena where I’d see diversity all around me. While they adopted their Roman-Catholic beliefs and held onto them because they had nothing else, I adopted my religion out of tradition and willingness. As Chanel said, “I have gotten more opportunities at my fingertips than my parents had when they were growing up and this has greatly influenced my opinion on politics and social issues.” Likewise, I have come to form my own opinions out of my own experiences and no matter how many times my parents may disagree with what I believe, I hold firmly to what I believe because what may have been true to them as teenagers is not the truth for me today. For example, growing up, my parents grew in families that mistrusted their government and didn’t bother with politics because they believed that to speak up would just earn them a bullet in the head. Now, decades later, I am looking forward to actively performing my civic duties including speaking up against what I believe is unjust. I only hope that my offspring will do the same and rebel against the truths I grew up with. After all, the truth can be ever-changing.

  30. The media has been a major influence in how my parents critique politics and the world around them. Of course television and radio are not the only sources of information they looked to, but those are the most prominent. With the news always turned on in the early morning before school and late evening during dinner, there is always something being thrown at my parents. The breaking news reports usually arose nodding heads of agreement or hotheaded debates of frustration at the family table. While my parents enjoy conducting heated talks of debate at home, I prefer to lay low on those topics. I never felt the urge to be fully invested into the discussion of politics. While I have never really had a valid reason for my opinion, I can assume what my parents intentions for political talk are. They have high expectations for society. My parents want what’s best for them and they also want what’s best for their children.
    My opinions on the world have always been mixed. Whether it’s a good or bad thing,I am usually one that is easily influenced by my encounters. I seem to have followed my parents route in having media shape my opinion. But I’m okay with that. As bruce describes perfectly for our tech-influenced generation: “We are connected to vast amounts of information and vast amounts of people to collaborate with, here we can find our ideals, here we can find ourselves.” Books, tv shows, and talk shows have shown me that history was never meant to be written through one lense. There will always be different opinions on any one subject and I don’t have to fully invest myself into one sole opinion.

  31. I am a millennial born from two baby boomer parents who have raised me. I also have two millennial older siblings who have helped shape me. Both of these groups have helped shape me. My parents are moderates who tend to lean on the liberal side. While they like to see themselves as open minded, some of their philosophies tend to be old fashioned. I am a bleeding heart liberal, which sometimes overwhelms my parents.
    Both my parents and I, are very accepting of the LGBTQ+ community and have no qualms towards them. We also believe in a woman’s right to choose and are for gun control. Since both of my parents are immigrants, we are for immigration and simplifying the process to make it easier to become a citizen. We are accepting of other cultures and do not discriminate. My parents and I for the most part agree on the same issues. Whenever we find that there is an issue that we do not agree on, we discuss it. Normally, my sisters and I manage to persuade our parents. So even when we do disagree, it is not for long because we are able to open their eyes.
    I am what you would call “woke”. I am aware of the evils of this country, and the racism that is still alive and well. While my parents and I are for the Black Lives Matter movement, but we have different opinions for how to go about the issue. My parents believe there should be more dialogue, while I am for their social movement and the revolution that they are beginning through social media and protests. This mostly comes from our difference in exposure to the movement. The Black Lives Matter movement is very strong on Twitter, but not so much on Facebook. Since my parents and I use different social media outlets, I believe that is where our difference in opinions come from.
    We also disagree on the importance of religion. My parents were raised catholic, and since they are latino, the religion is heavily intertwined in our culture. They believe that religion is necessary and without it, there would be no morals. I on the other hand, believe that religion is not necessary. I believe that religion is an outdated concept that is  no longer necessary in this day and age. While I do not deny anyone else of their religion, I feel it is not for me. I do respect people’s beliefs, and think it is a beautiful thing when they can have such a strong relationship with god. I just know that life is not for me. This stark contrast from my parents come from my family not being religiously disciplined while growing up. Once in a blue moon, my family would go to church, but it was not often. The contrast in our stances stem from the relevancy of catholicism while growing up.
    While my parents and I for the most part agree on social and political issues, we do have our differences. Thankfully, my parents and i respect our differences in opinions. We do get into debates every once in awhile, but they are always civil and respectful. Like Josh said, “everyone has different ideas, opinions, and sees the world differently”. Just because we think differently, does not mean one of us has to be wrong. We all have the right to our opinions, not matter how strange or terrifying.

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