Tuesday, February 17, 2015 – Jocelyn S.

Game Plan: 

  • SSR + scribes
  • Finish Romeo and Juliet
  • What makes a good EQ?

Homework:

Create 1 essential question and prepare for Harkness (Thursday)

 

Summary

Good evening North House! I hope you enjoyed your four day weekend, whether it have been going to Winter Formal or binge watching Netflix! 🙂

Today in English we began with our typical 20 minutes of SSR. Then, Ms. Edwards explained the importance of not watching the film (i.e. Romeo and Juliet), for content or for the plot, but to take out key points to possibly discuss in our Harkenss discussion as well as trying to connect the film with the play itself. She also reminded us that in Harkness discussions we are going to be graded as a group, and not as an individual, so even if you make one or two good comments, a good grade will only be given if an inquisitive and inspiring group discussion occurs.

Afterwards, we continued watching the movie Romeo and Juliet, and like the rowdy bunch we are, we got through it with plenty of side commentary and with a lot of uproar towards the scene depicting the death of Romeo and Juliet. The commotion surprised Edwards, considering that we all knew how this short romance would end, in tragedy.

Once the film had ended Ms. Edwards commented on our loud movie-watching habits, and also gave us several pointers on how to write a good essential question, which is our homework for tonight.

Questions to Consider:

  • Why do you think you reacted the way you did?
  • Why do you think the film makers made the decisions they did, when creating this movie?

Other Pointers:

  • Essential questions should
    • have more than one right answer (i.e. be open ended)
    • provoke and raise other inquiries
    • cause contemplation on the subject in question
  • Essential questions should NOT
    • end in a simple “yes” or “no” answer
    • only have one answer
  • For this particular essential question, feel free to include anything from the film, the play or the handout

Words to Know:

Dramatic Irony – when the audience knows something that a character does not

 

With all of this, we ended our first rotation in English. Enjoy what ever is left of the day, and good night!

– Jocie S. xoxo

 

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