2014 BLOG ASSIGNMENT #11

Read What to Pay the Babysitter.

Use Graff/Birkenstein’s They Say / I Say template to identify, pull apart, and respond to the article. Your response should be at least 250 words and should:

    1. Have a clever title properly capitalized.
    2. Use They Say / I Say template to fully develop both the author’s and the writer’s arguments.
    3. Accurately identify a central claim of the article.
    4. Appropriately lead into, blend, parenthetically cite, and discuss at least one quote or key fact / statistic from the article.
    5. Explain each quote and discuss your reaction to it (agree or disagree).
    6. Have concluding sentences.

Graff/Birkenstein’s They Say / I Say template:

Title: ______________________________

    The general argument made by author X in her/his work, _____________ , is that _____________. More specifically, X argues that ______________. She/he writes, “_______________________.” In this passage, X is suggesting that _________________. In conclusion, X’s belief is that _____________.

In my view, X is wrong/right, because ___________________________. More specifically, I believe that _____________________________. For example, __________ ________________________________________. Although X might object that ___________________ , I maintain that ___________________________. Therefore, I conclude that _______________________________________________.

 

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21 thoughts on “2014 BLOG ASSIGNMENT #11

  1. The not-so-simple overpayment to teens for simple jobs

    The general argument made by Jan Francisco in her work, “What to Pay the Babysitter”, is that teen babysitters are being paid too much to do simple babysitting tasks. More specifically, Ms. Francisco argues that teens are paid too much by adults for simple tasks such as mowing the lawn. She writes. “After the babysitter took my offer, because we are friends and I was interested, she and her brother started talking about what they get paid for other jobs. He said that he usually earns $30-40 each time he mows someone’s lawn. He was bewildered when a man in the neighborhood said $20 was too much to pay for just mowing his lawn.” In this passage, Ms. Francisco is suggesting that teenagers these days are paid a ridiculous amount of money for simple jobs. In conclusion, her belief is that the inflation of prices for simple jobs is causing teenagers to become increasingly demanding over jobs.

    In my view, Ms. Francisco is wrong, but at the same time, right to a certain extent because while it is true that there are people offering high payment for simple jobs, that doesn’t necessarily mean that all adults are doing the same. More specifically, I believe that some of her views could be taken out of context because of where these people live. For example, a poor person may not be able to pay a large amount of money to a babysitter, while a rich person could. Although Ms. Francisco might object that everyone pays teens high money, rich or poor, for simple tasks, I maintain that this could simply be demand and inflation, as she was mentioning in her article about how, “-the kids are saying, “This is so great! I am making so much money!” And the adults are saying, “Well, I guess if that is what people are paying, I had better stay competitive with what I pay too.” And the price keeps inflating higher and higher. Therefore, I conclude that Ms. Francisco is not entirely wrong, but it is the problem with inflation, as a teen will not want to work for the low paying adult to do the same thing that the high paying adults want them to do. I do agree, however, that the adults who hire teenagers for these jobs are at fault for paying them so high for so little work.

  2. Quality vs. Quantity
    The general argument made by Jan Francisco in her work, “What to Pay the Babysitter”, is that teens should work hard for the money they receive. More specifically, Francisco argues teens are less motivated to get jobs because they are earning too much money. She writes, “Yes, it is getting more expensive to do things, but also many kids just don’t seem to be very motivated to chase after things. Many of them are content to be carted around by their parents, have things paid for by their parents, and take their time reaching adulthood.” In this passage, Francisco is suggesting that teens who decide to work should get paid for their hard work and effort, not just by the hour. In conclusion, Francisco’s belief is that parents should pay for the quality of the worker, not the quantity.
    In my view, Francisco is right, because teens are not experienced enough to take on the real world. More specifically, I believe teens are too idle and would only work for their hours and would not put any effort in their service. For example, teens at McDonald’s are just going through the motions of making sandwiches, but none of them are going above and beyond in order to reach a higher position. Although Francisco might object that teens are lazy and should not get paid for their deficient work, I maintain that teens who work hard deserve a higher pay. Therefore, I conclude that teens who are employed deserve a higher pay if they show a high quality of work.

  3. Are you unmotivated

    The General argument made by Jan Francisco in the article, “What to Pay the Babysitter”, is that teens are getting paid far too much for simple jobs. To be more specific Fransisco states that teens are being paid an outrageous amount for simple jobs such as mowing lawns and babysitting when they aren’t even left many things to do, they do not even have to do the dishes or cook dinner all they need to do is sit down watch a movie with the kids and put them to bed but the teens are asking for way too much money just for something so simple. In this article Fransisco writes “So the kids are saying, this is so great! I am making so much money! And the adults are saying, Well, I guess if that is what people are paying, I had better stay competitive with what I pay too. And the price keeps inflating higher and higher.” This quote is suggesting that since teenagers are so used to getting paid so much for jobs they are refusing to do the same jobs for a cheaper rate when they can easily save up the money and get a more steady rate of income then just having a lot of money at just one time. Finally, Fransisco’s final conclusion is that very simple and easy tasked jobs are being paid way too much for the skill level of the job and that is leading kids to be mor epicky about the job they are doing and is leading teenagers to become lazy because they aren’t willing to work hard to save up.

    In my view for the passage, What to Pay the Babysitter”, I believe Jan fransisco is completely correct for all the points she made, where she is stateing that price inflation has gone up a ton since the 70’s and also that teens are becoming very lazy and have a lack of motivation to do anything and are very impatient to where they would rather get more money all at once for one job then to save up over a period of time for something they really want and are willing to take time out and save up for it. More specifically teens are just becoming overly lazy for easy tasks. For example, there is a huge decrease is kids getting their license and also teens working t grocery stores is down by about 40% since the 80’s. Although, teens might object that how are they suppose to get a job when all the jobs are being taken up by adults or that they are not first pick for a job because of their age. Other things teens might object to is that it is a struggle to get their license now days because the price of behind the hweel training is over $200 and back then they had drivind education in the schools. Also the teens may say that the price of gas is just overly priced. I maintain that, if you would really like to get your license or get a job or make a little extra money you would be willing to find a way or earn money to pay for the behind the wheel training. In conclusion, I believe Fransisco has many logical and effective points and I think teenagers should make an effort to get into the working force but don’t take it for granted.

  4. Reasonably Apathetic

    The general argument made by author, Jan Francisco, in her work, “What to Pay the Babysitter,” is that people nowadays expect more pay when doing menial jobs. More specifically, Francisco argues that nobody is benefitting from this situation. Parents who hire kids to babysit or mow their lawns usually cannot compete with the current going rate and decide not to do so in the first place. As a result, kids who could have had a steady income now have occasional jobs that pay a fairly good amount that they could burn through within a week. She writes, “… we are creating an unrealistic expectation for kids in what their time and energy is actually worth to the working world.” In this passage, Francisco is suggesting that kids today no longer experience desperation that would motivate them and lead them to a bigger and better life. In conclusion, Francisco’s belief is that people should stop inflating their wages in order to teach them the value of hard work.

    In my view, Francisco is wrong, because it is not as if kids are in control of their salary or that they have much choice when it comes to finding and acquiring jobs. More specifically, I believe that kids are not to blame for the way the world currently is. The younger generation did not sign up for a life that meant the thirty year old with years worth of experience would beat you to a menial job because times are hard. For example, standards today are vastly different where kids are expected to perfectly balance their jobs, social life, and classes all with their sanity intact. Although Francisco might object that “desperation and hard work” would teach kids how to be successful, I maintain that us “severely pathetic” kids are in no way lacking motivation or confidence, but still have much to learn. Therefore, I conclude that recent and previous generations need to work together in order to adapt to this ever-changing world instead of pointing fingers.

  5. The Clever Title About Paying Babysitters

    The general argument made by Jan Francisco in her work, “What to Pay the Babysitter,” is that teens today who are looking to make some extra money should be able to work for it: instead of overpaying them for doing simple jobs, pay them fairly according to how hard they work. More specifically, Francisco argues that babysitters today are being payed more than they deserve. Babysitters under the age of 16 are usually overpaid for doing very simple tasks which require very little effort. She writes that by doing this, “We are creating an unrealistic expectation for kids in what their time and energy is actually worth to the working world.” In this passage, Francisco is suggesting that in order to prepare children and teenagers for adulthood, they should first be taught hard work. Overpaying them is not helping them at all, and is only hurting their future. As the author stated, overpaying babysitters only raise their expectations. This is bad because if these expectations are not met, teenagers will only be discouraged from doing better. Francisco states that, “Desperation begets creativity. Creatively solving problems gives kids confidence to do more. Confidence in doing more leads to success.” If teenagers are taught that the amount of money they earn depends on their hard work, then they will be more motivated to work harder. In conclusion, Francisco’s belief is that the youth should not be overpaid just because other parents do. The only way they will learn hard work is if they come to the realization that they need to. In order to do this, teenagers and children should be paid at a fair amount.

    In my opinion, Francisco is right, because by overpaying teens, they are only being spoiled. More specifically, I believe that spoiling these children will only create a never-ending cycle which will progressively get worse. For example, the higher payment of babysitters today create expectations for teenagers and children. Even if it may be unrealistically high, many of them do not realize this as even the adults who pay them continue to pay more to make sure that they have someone to babysit for them. Although others might object that it may be too late to lower the amount babysitters and underage people are paid, I maintain that if all adults start to pay less, then teens will be forced to take what they can get. It’s not like they can never earn the same earnings. Occasional rewards will give them the mentality that if they work hard enough, then maybe they will start earning the same, if not more than before. Therefore, I conclude that if all teenagers are paid at a lower amount, then they will just get used to it. Not only will this hard work mentality give them more realistic expectations, but it will also force them to be more creative and work harder.

  6. How Much Do We Pay Our Babysitters?

    The general argument made by author Jan Francisco in her work, “What to Pay the Babysitter”, is that teenagers looking for a job in child care shouldn’t be paid such a large expense. More specifically, she argues that the amount of money given should be defined by the amount of worked displayed in the household. She writes, “we are creating an unrealistic expectation for kids in what their time and energy is actually worth to the working world.” In this passage, Francisco is suggesting how teenage expectations for money is high and their work effort is low. In conclusion, Francisco’s beliefs in a motive in which the amount of time subjected into the care of your children and the individuals work effort greatly determines the pay.
    In my view, Francisco is right and wrong, she is right because her views are fair and realistic, but she is also wrong because of her demand of extra chores with little pay in return. More specifically, I believe that if a person begins to add on to his or her responsibilities beside the child a significantly higher pay should be rewarded. For example, if he or she were to clean the household with a significant change in appearance as well as the backyard a higher pay should be given. Although Francisco might object that the house is left a mess with an uncared for child as she stated, “ But to sit and and watch a show, leave the house a mess and put the baby to bed with a saggy diaper — they haven’t earned much.”. This can be easily avoidable by informing the individual on how the house should maintain its cleanliness. I maintain my argument that these teenagers should be responsible and earn their money with a reasonable price. Therefore, I conclude that teenagers should be paid based on their work effort as well as the skills subjected when taking care of the children.

  7. The general argument made by author Jan Francisco in her work, “Why to Pay the Babysitter,” is that teenagers are not motivated to work for less money. More specifically, Francisco argues that teenagers are getting payed more than they deserve and how they work only for more money than the adults. She writes, “And second, we are creating an unrealistic expectation for kids in what their time and energy is actually worth to the working world.” In this passage, Francisco is suggesting that by paying teenager more money for easy jobs makes the teenagers think that they could make the same money in the real world with harder jobs. In conclusion, Francisco belief is that teenagers should not get payed more than they should get for easy jobs that would not get the same money for a real job in the real world.

    In my view, Francisco is wrong but at the same time right, because teenagers work for what they want just like people did back then. More specifically, I believe that we are motivated for working because we want things and we do work for things we want. For example, I wanted to go on a trip to New York with my friend, and to go on this trip I needed money to pay it. I saved money and I worked for the money I needed. Although Francisco might object that we are not motivated to work we are and we could work for the things we want and need, I maintain that we don’t do anything for free and we would work for things we need. Therefore, I conclude that we are motivated and we do get easy jobs and work and think that we are going to get payed more in the real world. We could work and get the things our parents won’t give/ buy us.

  8. Overpay for jobs; SIGN ME UP!

    The general argument made by author Jan Francisco in her work, “What to pay the babysitter”, is that teenagers are being overpaid. More specifically, Francisco argues that teenagers are overpaid for overly-simple jobs, like babysitting children and mowing lawns. She writes, “My position is that it is not a terribly hard job… I expect them to watch a movie with my kids and feed them a little pre-made dinner.” In this passage, Francisco is suggesting that in-order to get payed more for babysitting, the teen in question must do more when babysitting. In conclusion, Francisco’s belief is that the over payment of teenagers for jobs is absurd.

    In my view, Francisco is wrong, because when teenagers take a job, it is at the expense of several things (time, effort, energy, etc.). More specifically, I believe that teenagers will take any job more seriously if there is more money in it, because what they sacrificed in doing the job is made up in the larger payment. For example, If I had to take care of Mrs. Francisco kids and she paid me next to nothing, I would just leave. To put it simply, I value my time more than she thinks it is worth. Although Francisco might object that with a claim that its a easy, I maintain that position, reminding her that I choose my clients and that we work at a price I set. Therefore, I conclude that, firstly, Francisco is a lunatic for thinking she can swindle teenage workers in babysitting her kids at a low price, and secondly, in a private Peer to Peer job such as babysitting or lawn mowing, the price of being lazy has a cost, which is whatever the worker sets.

  9. You Better Work Harder
    The general argument made by author Jan Francisco in her work, “What to Pay the Babysitter”, is that knowing what to pay the babysitter can be difficult. More specifically, Jan Francisco argues that babysitters are over-payed for a very easy job. She writes, “My position is that it is not a terribly hard job: I don’t expect them to be the mom, I expect them to watch a movie with my kids and feed them a little pre-made dinner. Probably almost exactly what they would be doing at home for free.” In this passage, Jan Francisco is suggesting that teenagers are being over-payed, which is ultimately making them expect easy money from other jobs. In conclusion, Jan Francisco’s belief is that babysitters, most likely teens, should not be over-payed for their simple job, because it creates nothing but lazy, over expecting teenagers.

    In my opinion, Jan Francisco is wrong, because she is just bashing the teenager , all because they’re trying to get money. Honestly, kids are very tricky to deal with because of how much care goes into keeping them happy, on top of this you need to make sure that the parents are also happy with the service. Moreover, she also stated that babysitter should be payed around $5 an hour, which “was enough for a movie.” in her day. To adults it might seem like the only reason kids want a job, but theres so much more to it than that, they could be saving up for a car or for college, the list goes on to more meaningful spendings. More specifically, I believe that teenage babysitters should be payed a decent amount of money for taking care of children. Parents might say that their children are “little angels” but not always, especially when a not-much-older teenager is taking care of them. For example, sometimes my aunts and mom go out to the mall or market and I’m left taking care of six children, including my brother. On of my aunts is well aware that her four children are loud and crazy, but my other aunt insists that her daughter is an angel. Her daughter is the most problematic, because although the other kids are loud and crazy, they listen when I tell them something; the “angel” talks back. My point is that even though parents see their kids as one way, when left with someone else they’re completely the opposite. So babysitter probably deal with some pretty crazy kids, but for the sake of staying on the parents good side, they pretend that the kids no trouble at all. Although Jan Francisci might object that parents should know if their kids are problematic or not, I maintain that children could be different when the parents aren’t around. Therefore, I conclude that teenagers should be payed a decent amount of money for taking care of children because of all the responsibility and care, and also to the future they’re saving up for.

  10. The general argument made by Jan Fransisco in her work, “What to Pay the Babysitter,” is that nowadays people are expecting a higher pay than one that should be expected for completing simple tasks. More specifically, Fransisco argues that unless the job requires a tedious amount of effort and work, she will be paying what she believes it’s worth respectively. She writes in reference to the task of a babysitter, “I don’t expect them to be the mom, I expect them to watch a movie with my kids and feed them a little pre-made dinner. Probably almost exactly what they would be doing at home for free. If I could afford to pay them more, I would expect them to do more.” In this passage, Fransisco is suggesting that if the job isn’t hard, then there is no need to pay like it is. In conclusion, Fransisco’s belief is that jobs should have more realistic wages in terms of the amount of work required to complete a task.
    In my view, Fransisco is right, because she makes a lot of good points about the unrealistic pay that a lot of labor workers expect. More specifically, I believe that people should get payed in accordance to the difficulty of the task. For example, I would pay someone about $15 to mow my lawn. However, I may bump up the price depending on the size and effort it may take to mow the lawn. Although the laborers might object that ideology, I maintain that belief, because if they don’t like the pay, then they can simply decline the job. Therefore, I conclude that in this type of situation i should be able to adjust the pay to my liking if i don’t think the job calls for that much effort.

  11. You live to learn a learn to live

    The general argument made by author Jan Francisco in her work in her article “What to Pay the Babysitter, was on how to pay a babysitter based on what age they are, and the possible mini jobs that are held within. More specifically miss Francisco explained that there is much more to a baby sitting job than to what meets the eye. In this passage, miss Francisco she states that a teen baby sitting job is not a job that should be kept for life, but a job to help them learn for real paying jobs. The jobs that may require tedious work, different skills, obtain qualities and workmanship. As she wrote in her article (as I mentioned before) she suggests that teens should be taught different qualities, skills as they babysit. By giving them a different responsibility for something small that could build up to something big overall. For example, she pointed out that adding subtasks to what the teen is already expected to do (as in listing out what to do around the house and what not) helps them feel encouraged to do more. For that reason, the teen is expected a reward in the end. In conclusion miss Francisco believes babysitting is a job for good developmental and real life working skills.

    In my eyes I agree with miss Francisco because babysitting is a good job to have growing up. I have baby sat before, and I can relate to what the article states. I know I have learned a lot from babysitting, and I still use what I learned from my experiences. So more specifically, I believe that teens that baby sit can learn a lot from it, and use it in the real world. Whether it may be confidence or a simple task or small skill that can be used. Although I object to what miss Francisco said that baby sitting shouldn’t always be paid depending on the age, I maintain the fact that she likes teens to baby sit to gain experience. There fore I conclude that babysitting is a great job to do because you learn qualities for later in life.

  12. The Problem with Views on Teenagers

       The general argument made by author Jan Francisco in her work, “What to Pay the Babysitter,” is that teenagers are overpaid for the little work they do. More specifically, Francisco argues that simple jobs like mowing the lawn or making sure children don’t burn down the house, don’t deserve the high pay teenagers have been able to hustle out of the older generation. She writes, “I expect them to watch a movie with my kids and feed them a little pre-made dinner. Probably almost exactly what they would be doing at home for free,” in regards to babysitting. In this passage, Francisco is suggesting that for what a babysitter is doing, they should be happy they are getting any pay. In conclusion, Francisco’s belief is that if teenagers are to be getting any above average pay, they should be doing above average work.

    In my view, Francisco is wrong, because she doesn’t see the genius that is a teenage worker. More specifically, I believe that teenagers are better business people than the prior generation because if their ability to do so little work and earn more pay than a real job. For example, Francisco uses the anecdote about her father in-law to show how dedication to a goal and hard work is what deserves her money, however, her father in law took an entire year to scavenge about $1,775, while the boy she mentioned in the beginning of the article can mow 36 lawns at his rate of $50 and make an extra $25 for a fraction of the time and work. Although Francisco might object that overpaid work creates a false image of what a real job is like, I maintain that learning to create such a high margin of profit will only make better business people in the future. Therefore, I conclude that Francisco is falsely judging the teenagers who can make a large amount of money because, teenagers can dedicate themselves to a goal, like Francisco proclaims they can’t, and reach that goal in a highly efficient manner.

  13. Hard Work = Well Deserved Pay

    The general argument made by Jan Francisco in her work, “What to Pay the Babysitter” , is that much of our generation, specifically nowadays, doesn’t really know what it is like to have to actually work hard and deserve the rewards we are getting. Francisco presents many examples where this may happen, like a babysitting job or a pizza place job. More specifically, Francisco argues that by paying a teenager too much for a job that does not deserve that pay, does no good to either end of the business/job or worker. She writes on the consequences regarding babysitting, “So the teenagers are potentially losing out on steady work and the commitment of holding a regular babysitting job because the going rate is more than many families can afford.” “And we are creating an unrealistic expectation for kids in what their time and energy is actually worth to the working world,” she also mentions. In this passage, Francisco is suggesting that people need to pay teenagers a relatively reasonable price for the job that they have done. She also suggests that if they do want more money, “Point out exactly what you would like to have them do while you are gone. ” In conclusion, Francisco’s belief is that we need to pay the youth a reasonable, deserved pay because it actually can affect many factors of your neighborhood and overall area.

    In my view, Francisco is somewhat right, because her points are realistic and reasonable. More specifically, I believe that we only deserve what we work for and not more. However, things nowadays are much different from the past. Things are more expensive and people are willing to spend money on things others may not. For example, babysitting two well behaved kids may not seem like a hard job, but it’s one thing to just watch what they’re doing and actually care/bond with them. Although Francisco might object that we need to struggle a little to learn , I maintain that some teenagers or adults don’t need to struggle if they are doing their very best. Therefore, I conclude that if you do your very best at something and succeed, you should be rewarded fairly.

  14. You get what you pay for

    The general argument made by author Jan Francisco in her work, “What to Pay the Babysitter”, we are overpaying our teenagers for simple jobs. More specifically, Francisco argues that teenagers expect such a huge pay when they’re doing simple things such as babysitting. She writes, “But to sit and watch a show, leave the house a mess and put the baby to bed with a saggy diaper — they haven’t earned much.” In this passage, Francisco is suggesting that Babysitters do not deserve a lot of money when all they do is just watch a movie, which they would probably already be doing at their own home. In conclusion, Francisco’s belief is that Babysitters should get paid for what they deserve. If all their doing is watching a movie they only deserve $5 but if they watch a movie make dinner and wash dishes they would defiantly be paid more just because they are doing more.

    In my view, Francisco is right, because paying babysitters a lot of money for not doing anything is ridiculous. More specifically, I believe that everyone should be paid for what they deserve. For example, if we pay teenagers a lot of money for doing almost nothing then when they get a real job they will be upset they make the same amount of money when they were babysitting but now they actually have to do work. Although some people might object that it is not going to affect their outlook on working I maintain the idea that it will because when I had my job it was very difficult work but they paid us what we deserved which makes me appreciate hard work more and understand that people who work harder deserve more money than those who don’t. Therefore, I conclude that all babysitters should get paid what they deserve whether or not it’s below minimum wage. If they don’t like the idea then they can find work elsewhere.

  15. Work for Money and Experience

    The general argument made by author Jan Francisco in her work, “What to Pay the Babysitter” , is that teenagers are being paid too much for simple, easy jobs. More specifically, Francisco argues that teenagers are doing little to no effort jobs and are getting paid more money than what they deserve. She writes, “So the teenagers are potentially losing out on steady work and the commitment of holding a regular babysitting job because the going rate is more than many families can afford.” In this passage, Fransico is suggesting that teenagers need to be payed on how they did on the job. In conclusion, Franscio’s belief is that the new generation of kids need to be payed on the work they did, and so they can get experienec for when they get a real job.

    In my view, Fransico is right, because her claims are true and understandable. More specifically, I believe that we should be payed on how well we did the job and just not being lazy. However, a lot has changed from the past till today. Thanks to inflation, products are more expensive and people will do whatever job that will pay good. For example, while mowing a lawn seems to be a walk in the park, it isn’t when you have to do it. Although Fransico might object that teenagers are lazy and we need to learn by doing tedious work, I maintain that people can be motivated if you give them a push. Therefore, I conclude that motivation and determination will have people do more better work.

  16. Are we Paying too Much for Simple Tasks?

    The general argument made by author Jan Francisco in her work, “What to Pay the Babysitter,” is that teens are being paid way too much for the simple tasks that they are asked to do. More specifically, Francisco argues that the prices teens are earning now should be brought down to a price that fits the requirements, and if they go above of what is asked of them, then that is when they can earn a bit more. She writes, “My position is that it is not a terribly hard job: I don’t expect them to be the mom, I expect them to watch a movie with my kids and feed them a little pre-made dinner.” In this passage, Francisco is suggesting that teens are not asked to do much in order to be earning the prices they are receiving, and their prices should match the work that they put into the job.

    In my view, Francisco is both right and wrong, because many teens are getting paid more than what they are working for and asked to do, but they still earn a lot of working experience for future jobs. More specifically, I believe that the quality a teen gives should fit the quantity that they are receiving. For example, Francisco states that if a child is younger and more difficult to handle, then the teen will be earning more than if the kid was a bit older and just sat still and watched a movie throughout the day. Although Francisco might object that teenagers have never before been so impressive or so useless, I maintain that teens are a lot more useful and hardworking than Francisco may believe we are. Therefore, I conclude that teens may be earning more than what fits the requirements of our job, but we do work hard and still earn much experience for what may help us in the long run.

  17. What is a steady income?

    The general argument made by author Jan Francisco in her work, “What to pay the Babysitter”, is generally regarding the amount teens are being paid for the small simple jobs. More specifically, Francisco argues that teens are being paid an absurd amount of money for neighborhood jobs such as babysitting and moving lawns. The author expressed that teens aren’t left to wash dishes or cook dinner…so why pay them so much for the little amount that they do. “ We are creating an unrealistic expectation for kids in what their time and energy is actually worth to the working world.” This quote expresses that teens are being paid an outrageous amount that they become immune to the pay and don’t want to get a stable and formal job making reality unrealistic. Teens become/are blindsided when any sort of income comes their way. Francisco mentioned that getting a formal job at a cheaper rate allows to save up money for a more steady rate of income…instead teens are preferring a full bloat of pay at one time causing them not to realize how unrealistic and hinder hence it may cause them in the near future. In this passage, Jan Francisco is suggesting that teens are being paid way too much with ‘neighborhood’ jobs leading to an unsatisfying and unenticing amount of pay with a formal job. This also leads to teens struggling in the future with no motivation to successfully obtain a job. In conclusion, I believe Francisco has various effective points throughout the article and i think any one person who is at age and eligible to get a job, not to take it for granted.

    In my view, Jan Francisco is wrong and right, because she has very logical points about income and how us,teens are being paid but teens do not have control of the salary that is earned. Our world is forever changing causing previous generations to have conflicts with any change now. I believe that with any manner of income there will always be conflict therefore leaving adults conflicted with our forever changing world and ways.

  18. What is a steady income?

    The general argument made by author Jan Francisco in her work, “What to pay the Babysitter”, is generally regarding the amount teens are being paid for the small simple jobs. More specifically, Francisco argues that teens are being paid an absurd amount of money for neighborhood jobs such as babysitting and moving lawns. The author expressed that teens aren’t left to wash dishes or cook dinner…so why pay them so much for the little amount that they do. “ We are creating an unrealistic expectation for kids in what their time and energy is actually worth to the working world.” This quote expresses that teens are being paid an outrageous amount that they become immune to the pay and don’t want to get a stable and formal job making reality unrealistic. Teens become/are blindsided when any sort of income comes their way. Francisco mentioned that getting a formal job at a cheaper rate allows to save up money for a more steady rate of income…instead teens are preferring a full bloat of pay at one time causing them not to realize how unrealistic and hinder hence it may cause them in the near future. In this passage, Jan Francisco is suggesting that teens are being paid way too much with ‘neighborhood’ jobs leading to an unsatisfying and unenticing amount of pay with a formal job. This also leads to teens struggling in the future with no motivation to successfully obtain a job. In conclusion, I believe Francisco has various effective points throughout the article and i think any one person who is at age and eligible to get a job, not to take it for granted.

    In my view, Jan Francisco is wrong and right, because she has very logical points about income and how us,teens are being paid but teens do not have control of the salary that is earned. Our world is forever changing causing previous generations to have conflicts with any change now. I believe that with any manner of income there will always be conflict therefore leaving adults conflicted with our forever changing world and ways.

  19. Nothing Worthwhile Ever Comes Easy

        The general argument made by author Jan Francisco in her work, “What to Pay the Babysitter”, is that teenagers today are being motivated incorrectly to work part-time jobs. More specifically, Francisco argues that teenagers that works as babysitters or any part-time jobs are getting paid more than what they deserve to get. She writes, “we are creating an unrealistic expectation for kids in what their time and energy is actually worth to the working world.” In this passage, what she really meant is that the adults and parents, are not giving or letting them a better view of how hard and complicated working is. To earn more money, it requires more hard working. Just like the saying goes “NO PAIN, NO GAIN.” Teenagers must realize this so they will be motivated to work hard just like how they are (or suppose to) study in school. In conclusion, Francisco’s belief is that overpaying teenagers, like from her examples and stories in the article, stops them from becoming creative and develop their skills or what they are capable of doing to receive what they want.

    In my view, Francisco is right, because teenagers, every one in general, should know that nothing is easy in life. In the Holy Bible, it says “Don’t get discouraged and give up, for we will reap a harvest of blessing at the appropriate time.” More specifically, I believe that people should have lots of dedication and effort to his or her work, or even go through sacrificing sometimes, to get what they deserve as a reward. For example, an overweight woman wanted to get a Victoria Secret Model’s body; so then she decided to lose weight. To get to her goal, she needs to maintain doing intense cardio workouts and eat certain amounts of right foods. Although it will take her a long period of time, she will be really satisfied on long-time dream Victoria Secret body. Therefore, I conclude that adults and parents must teach teenagers to know that nothing worthwhile ever comes easy in life.

  20. $30 for babysitting? Give me a break

    The general argument made by author X in her/his work, “What to Pay the Babysitter”, is that many of the teenagers today simply aren’t prepared for the real world when trying to get a job or just become an independent adult. More specifically Francisco talks about how teens are getting payed a large salary for doing jobs like mowing the lawn, babysitting, and other house chores when those jobs don’t require much work. This puts teens at a disadvantage when going into the real world because of their laid back attitude and expectation to be paid the same for a job as they would for a house chore at the same amount of work put in. She writes, “We are creating an unrealistic expectation for kids in what their time and energy is actually worth to the working world.” In this passage Fransisco is suggesting that paying teens large salaries for low amounts of work will harm them in the future and slow down their path to adulthood. In conclusion, Francisco argues that teens should not be paid a lot of money for doing simple and easy work, this gives teenagers the mentality that their parents or chores will be enough to support them and in doing this leaves teens unprepared and not motivated to find and work in real jobs.

    The way I see it Francisco is spot on with her arguments. This is because I can relate to it as a teenager myself. I maintain such a mentality she talks about feeling as if my parents and chores can sustain me financially. This puts me at a disadvantage because I don’t know what to expect when going into the real world. More specifically I believe that parents need to do a better job at training their children to become better prepared when looking for a job and becoming an independent adult. If this doesn’t happen then the unemployment rate among teens will continue to rise. More specifically I believe that teenagers should be payed less for simple work like babysitting, the writer has a good philosophy on why no one should be payed a lot for easy work and even goes as far to explain the defects of doing such in explicit detail. For example when the writer states, ” Kids just don’t seem to be very motivated to chase after things. Many of them are content to be carted around by their parents, have things paid for by their parents, and take their time reaching adulthood.” Although Francisco might object that kids should be paid up to 20 dollars for mowing a lawn or babysitting, I still maintain my own opinion that kids need a good source of money in order to prepare themselves for jobs. If kids are payed too low of a salary for work around the house then they won’t be motivated to do that and will end up not doing any work at all. Therefore I conclude that Francisco makes a very good point on teens being paid large wages for easy work is in the long run harmful, I still think that if teens aren’t payed at least a decent wage then they won’t be motivated to work.

  21. On “Stellar” Teenagers and Why the Mantra “Back In My Day” Doesn’t Work

    The general argument made by author Jan Francisco in her work, “What to Pay the Babysitter”, is that today’s teenagers are being overpaid for their isolated odd jobs, including babysitting and doing yard work. More specifically, Francisco makes the argument that the act of overpaying a teen for simple jobs creates and perpetuates unrealistically high expectations on the teen’s part: they will be under the misconception that their work and time is more valuable than it actually is, and they’ll be of this belief as they enter the working world and subsequently suffer for it. In this passage. She writes, “…we are inflating teenager’s wages for babysitting and yard work and the minimum wage job at the grocery store down the street is not enticing at all”. In this passage, she suggests that when overpaid for their small odd jobs, teenagers will lack motivation and interest in gaining a formal job. In Francisco’s words, “they [teens] don’t want to get a formal job for less money than they are used to getting around the neighborhood”. In conclusion, Francisco’s belief is that overpaying teenagers is essentially doing the a disservice: teenagers that enter the working world with harmfully high expectations of what they should be earning for their work (which is of substantially less worth than they valued it to be).

    In my view, Francisco is wrong– while her points are comprehensible, I believe she wrong because of her summarized view on the money-desperate teenager is skewed, as she fails to portray both the entire picture of the situation and teenagers’ views wholesomely. More specifically, I believe that teenagers overpaid for their simple, informal jobs do so out of the same desperation she describes she and other kids had in her childhood, and not out of preference to keep their higher-paying babysitting jobs. Today’s times and financial situation for teenagers and their families are vastly different than that of “in her day”– they are two completely different things, to the point where comparing them is virtually useless. The standards held of children in her day cannot be held to teenagers of today. For example, this tendency of hers spawns her harmful belief that “there are some really stellar kids out there making their way. And some severely pathetic ones”. “Stellar” references how similar an individual teenager is similar to that of the money-seeking children of her childhood. As I said, teenagers today cannot be held to expectations of kids from years ago– times have changed. Although she might object with citations of how splendid she views the workforce she, her siblings, and older families displayed as children, I maintain that the comparison she draws and the picture she paints on the matter to be messy, inaccurate, and simply not applicable to today’s teenage work force. Therefore, I conclude that Francisco’s skewed perception of the teenage work force and their drive to work is in the wrong, and hope that she look into the subject more carefully.

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